How Your Art Makes People Feel

©Margaux Lange, Bust Heart Necklaces. Salvaged Barbie doll parts, sterling silver, and hand-pigmented resins, pendant measures 1.5 x 1.25 inches.

People don’t buy what you do or why you do it. They buy how it makes them feel. – Bernadette Jiwa

When I heard Jiwa utter those words on a stage in Denver last year, I had an AHA! moment. I had previously been sucked in by Simon Sinek’s famous TED Talk, Start With Why.

People don’t buy what you do, or how you do it. They buy why you do it.

It’s a powerful message that is hard to disagree with, yet it fell short for many artists, who were paralyzed for months or years over the inability to nail their Why.

Jiwa’s quote adds clarification. People buy how it makes them feel.

People buy your art because it makes them feel something.

To find your purpose (your why), all you have to do is remember the connection you are making with others through your art.

Continue reading…

How to Promote Your Art Exhibition on Your Website

©Donna Iona Drozda, Clear Cut 1. Mixed media on board, 12 x 12 inches. Used with permission.

If you have an important exhibition coming up, give it the space it deserves. Create a special page on your website just for your show.

You probably already have a page for all of your exhibitions, but I’m talking about a single page that features only your special show.

This will be the premier place you send people for details about your special show.

Why would you only share this info on Facebook or in an email when you can create a storefront for your art? You’re paying for the virtual real estate already. Might as well use it!

Everything will be in one spot rather than scattered around online or in someone’s inbox.

The URL (website address) should be one that’s easy to share and to remember rather than a string of slashes and numbers. This isn’t always as easy if you have a template site, but make it happen if possible.

Here’s what your exhibition page should include:

Continue reading…

The Liberating Magic Of The Brain Dump

Brain Dump Notebook

Every so often, you have to conduct a brain dump.

I hear you asking: What is a brain dump?

A brain dump is a magical process that gets everything out of your head and onto paper. And, yes, I find that paper is where it has to happen. The computer is too distracting.

You know it’s time for a brain dump when you’re overwhelmed. Your head is about to burst, your stomach is fluttering, and your chest feels tight.

You’re feeling like you can’t get all of your tasks done in the time you have, and God bless the poor person who asks you for a favor right now. Oh, boy! Will they ever get an earful!

Another sign it’s time for a brain dump is that you are unfocused – you know that you have a lot to do, but can’t decide what is the best use of your time in this moment.

Brain dump to the rescue!

Here are the 6 steps I recommend for the process.

Step 1: Prepare For Your Brain Dump

I like to begin tasks with focused intention and name the task: Now, I am sitting down to get whatever is in my head onto this piece of paper. Sometimes I even

Continue reading…

Artists' Career Moves from Beginner to Established

©Diane Varner, The Prayer. Photograph. Used with permission.

There are no set steps that can take you from the beginning of your art career to the pinnacle of success.

I know you would feel much more at ease if I could advise you to first do this, and then do that, and then do this other thing, and if you follow each step precisely, you’ll be assured a spot in the history books. But I can’t do that.

What I can do is give you some sort of idea of the phases artists work through over the course of their careers: a timeline of artists’ career moves from just starting out to the highest levels of establishing and cementing a reputation.

First, a word of caution: Because an article is linear, you might read this and think that you have to implement one step before you can move on to the next step. This isn’t the case.

I can’t come up with a single artist who has hit on each one of these points.

Artists who are full of confidence and forging their own paths can jump past entire sections!

Hopefully this list will plant the seeds for your next move.

Beginning Your Art Career

Start your mailing list immediately. You will have no idea what to do with this, but trust me. Just

Continue reading…

5 Crucial Things To Do After Your Art Opening

Karin Olah speaks at her opening. Photo courtesy Alicia Leeke.

Your art opening is not the end. It’s only the beginning.

It’s common for artists to be bummed after an opening. So much work went into making the art, promoting the event, and installing it. No wonder you’re deflated when you wake up the next morning.

This is when you must soldier on. You have artwork hanging in a public space, and it’s the perfect time to get some things done that couldn’t happen if your art had stayed in the studio.

The fun starts now with these 5 To Dos.

1. Schedule a Photo Shoot

When your work is hung in a beautiful setting, you want pictures!

This is no time for amateur hour. You need fantastic photos to use in your promotions and to document the occasion.

Get photos of:

Continue reading…

Investigating Venues for Showing Your Art

Caption: ©Jayne Rose, Transfixed. Oil on gessoboard, 16 x 20 inches. Used with permission.

If you have exhibiting your art on your list of goals (as you should), you’re probably overwhelmed.

First, there’s the research into potential venues. As soon as you begin the process (and it is a process), you will uncover venues you never knew existed if you live in a metropolitan area. One leads to another which leads to another…

Which brings up the second phase of overwhelm. Once you have this list of possible spaces, how do you determine which ones might be good choices for you?

What makes a venue attractive for an exhibition of your art? Let’s look at the pluses and minuses of potential venues using the checklists below.

It’s surely too much to ask that one venue might meet all the criteria for being a desirable location. You will have to weigh the positive and negative of each space. What can you live with?

On The Plus Side

The favorable aspects of a particular venue might be that it:

Continue reading…

Fill In The Blanks to Set Your Goals

©Marcie Cohen, Snowy Bank. Used with permission.

It’s a New Year and new start.

Everyone is talking about either setting goals or why you should avoid setting goals or making resolutions at all costs.

I’m not big on resolutions, but I stand firmly in the “goals are good for you” camp. I’ve seen them work for my clients and know they’ve propelled me further than I would have been without them.

So, let’s set some goals!

I’ve adapted the questions from the annual review and The See Plan to help you set goals for the New Year.

Promise not to go crazy with the process. Aim for 3-5 big goals for your year. This list is a starting point.

1. Creativity

Continue reading…

Lessons From The Past Year

©2012 Michelle Paine, Pilgrimage: St. Peter’s. Oil on canvas, 30 x 24 inches. Used with permission.

It’s hard to keep up with weekly emails about your art business, so I thought I’d point out some things that you might have missed or forgotten about this past year.

These are 12 valuable actions, from 12 different Art Biz Blog posts in 2015, to help you grow your art career while staying sane.

Marketing Your Art

1. Reduce the Boring Factor: Add Variety to Your Marketing Message

Why it’s on the list: Please, for the love of Pete, read this before you send another email.

Your art exhibition, class, workshop, or event has so many facets that there is no reason to send the same emails and social media posts for your promotions. They get a little stale after a while.

I have some ideas for you.

Continue reading…

Wrapping Up the Year with Your Personal Review

©Margaret Dukeman, Reflections of Lilies. Oil on canvas, 30 x 40 inches. Used with permission.

I thought I could get by without a personal review for one year. Or at least I thought I would skip mine.

Then I thought that you probably don’t need a reminder either. Who will notice if I don’t send? Who has time to do a personal review anyway?

Then I thought again. (There’s been a lot of thinking going on.) It’s a terrible idea to skip the personal review. And it’s a worse idea to let you think it’s okay to skip it.

As an entrepreneur, it’s critical to review actions and to celebrate accomplishments before moving on to the next phase. We’ll never improve our results until we understand where we are and how we got here.

So, it’s time to look back on your year and assess your progress.

This year, try using the elements of The See Plan – the 8 C’s – to structure your questions: creativity, commitment, clarity, community, connection, confidence, completion, and celebration.

Grab a notebook and a pen and get started.

Continue reading…

It’s a Choice, Not a Sacrifice

©2014 Carmen Mariscal, Au fil de l'Eau/ Al filo del agua 1/1. Installation : cut-out photographs (4 black and white and 12 color), mirrors and transparent thread. Photos range from 39.3 x 59 inches to 11.8 x 6.7 cm. With permission by the Bibliothèque Nationale de France BnF. Photographed by Claude Gaspari. Used with permission.

In 2000 I had been working in art museums for 10 years and had a great job as a director of education.

And I was miserable.

I had a choice. I could keep being miserable, or I could do something about it. I chose the latter. The next year I sold my house and donated many of my belongings. Then I packed up a U-Haul and moved to a small garage apartment in Denver.

I started an art-consulting business and was instantly happier.

I had no steady paycheck, no health insurance, and no idea how to run a business. But I was blissfully happy.

I chose happiness over the security of a museum job.

It was rocky in the beginning, but I kept getting requests for help from artists I had known in my museum career and others who found my art-consulting business online. I chose to listen to them.

I could have easily held firm to my original plan, but I made a different choice that has worked out pretty well.

Choice v. Sacrifice

We often think that building an art career requires sacrifice. You might sacrifice:

Continue reading…