Are Art Consultants Right For You?

This article is excerpted and summarized from an interview with artist Leslie Neumann for my Art Biz Incubator. Leslie generously shared her experience working with art consultants. The key points here are provided by Leslie and with include my annotations.

If you have a solid studio practice and welcome the challenge of commissioned work, art consultants might be a good sales venue for you.

What Art Consultants Do and Who They Are

Art consultants are people who seek and buy art for a client, whether it’s a healthcare company, a private collector, or a hotel.

Leslie Neumann with her paintings Beauty Deep Within and Fateful, Faithful. Each 60 x 45 inches.

The difference between art consultants and designers is that, generally speaking, a designer is responsible for the whole job and not just the artwork. They’ll do everything from fabrics to lighting, accessories, and furniture.

Designers know design. Art consultants should

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5 Steps to a Magazine Feature of You and Your Art

photo of Patricia Griffin

The November 2014 / January 2015 edition of Professional Artist magazine features an article by me titled “Think Before You Leap: Beware of People Who Tell You to Follow Your Passion.”

The editor suggested photos of artists at work to accompany the article and I knew exactly who to contact: ceramic artist Patricia Griffin.

Patricia Griffin in her studio. Photo by Debbie Markham.

Patricia is a member of my Art Biz Incubator and I receive her newsletter.

Months ago she sent an email with gorgeous photos of her in the studio. I complimented her on the images and she told me that she had hired a professional photographer to take photos of her in the studio. It showed.

Patricia’s photos were so engaging that they stood out among the hundreds of emails I see from artists. I remembered

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10-Year Anniversary Tweekly Special

Art Biz Experts

The Art Biz Blog is 10 years old today! Happy anniversary to us.

I couldn’t let this special day fly by without posting something here. So, in honor of the occasion, here’s a special Tweekly edition: my top tweets since the last Tweekly (a long long time ago) – along with a few pics from Art Biz Makeover 2014.

Thank you for being a reader,

 

General Business

How To Get Good At Making Money: 6 Life Lessons From A Self-Made Entrepreneur zite.to/1tugCRp

The panel of experts was a huge hit with my guests at Art Biz Makeover 2014. Photo by Regina-Marie Photographer.

The 5-Step Process for Writing an About Page that Connects (and Converts) flip.it/Vzb0C<excellent info via @copyblogger

7 Things Confident Entrepreneurs Never Do zite.to/1zf8OT6

7 Crucial Web Design Trends For 2015 zite.to/1xfojMX

Why More

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A Feast for the Eyes: Food in Art

©Sarah Atlee, Lunch at Sakagura. Acrylic and colored pencil on paper, 22 x 22 inches. Used with permission.

Wishing you a very Happy Thanksgiving – surrounded by people you love and filled with yummy food.

Here’s a no-calorie feast just for your eyes.

©Sylvia Tucker, Onions with Copper Bowl. Oil, 12 x 16 inches. Used with permission.

 

©Sarah Atlee, Lunch at Sakagura. Acrylic and colored pencil on paper, 22 x 22 inches. Used with permission.

 

©Jonathan Meter, Shishito Peppers with Lime. Photograph. Used with permission.

 

©Richard Hall, Heirlooms. Oil, 36 x 34 inches. Used with permission.

 

©2010 Karin Olah, Newton’s Daydream. Fabric, gouache, acrylic, and graphite on canvas, 36 x 12 inches. Used with permission.

 

©Sarah B. Hansen, Sunshine in a Box. Watercolor on Plexiglas, 30 x 22 inches. Used with permission.

Please share your gratitudes in a comment or even a link to your own eye feasts.

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Single-Tasking Is The Answer for Improved Productivity

Would you like to get more done in less time? Then quit multitasking!

Multitasking is working on diverse tasks simultaneously and, usually, doing them all half-heartedly: driving and talking on the phone; attending a webinar and responding to email; or writing a blog post and texting.

Research shows that only about 2.5% of college students can multitask effectively. Two point five percent!

©2011 Corrina Sephora, Hull Trilogy (dtl). Mixed media. Used with permission.

Studies now show that multitasking is a myth. You simply can’t give your attention to more than one thing at a time.

Health magazine gives 12 reasons to kick the habit, including the insight that multitasking dampens your creativity: “… multitaskers often find it harder to daydream and generate spontaneous ‘a ha moments’.”

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Let It Go: Delegating Responsibility

©Tara Pappas, The Release. Mixed media, 12 x 6 inches. Used with permission.

©Tara Pappas, The Release. Mixed media, 12 x 6 inches. Used with permission.

The biggest lesson from last week’s Art Biz Makeover: Let go of control.

After several discussions with my guests, it was clear that few people were willing to bring others into their art businesses.

When someone asked me if I ever slept, I happily responded that I got 8 hours sleep the night before. Really. And I did it because I hired people that I trust to stuff the goodie bags, get the name badges together, staff the registration table, select the music, order the food, and put out fires.

Delegate Responsibility

I learned a long time ago that if I was going to build my business to be more profitable, I was going to have to trust others.

I have read

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How I Screwed Up My Pitch and What You Can Learn From My Colossal Error

©Lisa Cirenza, Tubers. Acrylic and oil on board, 70 x 100 centimeters. Used with permission.

Tomorrow is the final day of this year’s Art Biz Makeover event, and I have scheduled a special session on pitching your art that includes a panel of art world folks who are pitched to by artists all of the time.

©Lisa Cirenza, Tubers. Acrylic and oil on board, 70 x 100 centimeters. Used with permission.

As I was preparing for this event, I approached someone that I wanted to sit on this panel of art experts. I broke all of my rules for pitching ideas to people and couldn’t have screwed up the situation worse than I did.

Here’s how it went down in an only slightly edited, simplified version.

Me: We’ve never met, but I teach artists how to build their businesses. I’d like to stop by and introduce myself.

Other person: I don’t see how

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Schedule Something Scary and Extraordinary

©Joey Feldman, Vicious. Pen and ink on paper, 28 x 20 inches. Used with permission

It’s scary to step up – to think bigger about what you’re capable of – and that’s exactly what I’ll be asking of attendees at Art Biz Makeover next week.

There’s very little motivation in the daily grind: update Facebook, schedule a few tweets, send a newsletter, write a blog post, work in studio. If you’re not careful, you’ll continue to go through the motions of life without doing something extraordinary for your art and for yourself.

©Joey Feldman, Vicious. Pen and ink on paper, 28 x 20 inches. Used with permission.

In honor of the witching season, I ask you to scare yourself a little. Give yourself a challenge that motivates you to get out of bed and into the studio every day. Take on a quest.

Anatomy of a Quest (with Examples)

According to Chris Guillebeau, author of The Happiness

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Who You Are and What You Do

what-you-do-550

Alert subscriber Clay Cantrell sent me the quote in this image some months ago, saying that it reminded him of me.

The difference between who you are and who you want to be is what you do. [Tweet this.]

I tracked down the quote to, as best I can tell, fitness guru Bill Phillips.

I wanted to share this with you because I can’t think of a quote that is more inspirational for me right now, and I hope it serves you.

Who I Am

You know me as someone who is a no-excuse-action-taking-don’t-stop-working kinda gal. I have never had a problem taking action.

But that’s only a tiny part of WHO I want to be.

Who I Want To Be

Over the past few years, I have loosely been seeking some form of spirituality. “Seeking” isn’t really the right word.

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17 Surprising Ways to Lure People to Your Website

©Julie Gowing Hayes, Party Barge. Oil on linen panel, 20 x 30 inches. Used with permission.

The darnedest thing about having a website: just because you build it doesn’t mean people will come.

Creating a website is just the first step. Now you have to get people to visit it, and driving traffic to your site is an ongoing task. It should always be top of mind.

©John-Michael Korpal, Twig Balloons. Mixed media, 6 x 8 feet. Used with permission.

See if you could add some of these ideas to your marketing mix and get more eyes on your art.

Best, Basic Practices

1. Write a newsletter article with a hook, which requires recipients to visit your site to read the end of the article.

2. Tell people why they should click. What’s in it for them?

3. Give something away to people who visit your site and sign up for your list.

3. Mention your website address

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