Reduce the Boring Factor: Add Variety to Your Marketing Message

Art Biz Coach: Vary Your Marketing Message

No more repetitive emails, please.

Your art exhibition, class, workshop, or event has so many facets that there is no reason to send the same emails and social media posts for your promotions. They get a little stale after awhile.

Years ago, Marcia Yudkin wrote a guest post for me on this topic. It was an article she originally wrote for her readers that got me interested.

I still think about that article and keep that list as a reference. It’s time to revisit its premise for you, my artist readers.

Here are plenty of ways to promote your exhibition, event, or teaching.

Many of these suggestions lend themselves to emails. Others could easily be used on social media. Use your noggin to decide.

Exhibition or Event Enticements

Rotate images of your art with short 2- or 3-sentence stories for each.

Do this for two reasons: 1) people are more likely to get excited about a show when they know what they’ll see and

Art Exhibition Checklist and Timeline to Customize

Exhibition Checklist

A checklist can keep you on task for your exhibition.

The tasks on your checklist, and the deadlines you give them, will depend on the following:

– The type of exhibition (juried, self-curated, open studio)
– If the venue is in charge of sales and refreshments or if that’s up to you
– Whether you’re showing with other artists
– How much time you have to plan

Do It Now

Set a goal. What would you like to have happen at this exhibition or as a result of it?

Plan your budget. How much can you afford to spend on materials and framing? How much can you allocate to promotions, printing, and a reception?

Identify a theme and

How To Attract More Followers to Your List

How to Attract More Followers

At last week’s Social Sharing Savvy training sessions, I received numerous questions along these lines:

“How can I get more subscribers/followers/fans?”

Watch the language you use and the energy around it. In particular, I’m worried about using the g-word: get.

“Get” could mean anything. It could mean that you buy a list or sleazily grab email addresses from people who didn’t ask to hear from you.

To my ears, getting sounds greedy and aggressive. With get, the emphasis seems to be on quantity rather than quality.

It sounds like you’re only interested in the marketing numbers when you should be far more interested in connecting with people who, in turn, want to connect with your art. You don’t just want numbers. You want the right individuals to add up to those numbers.

Stop looking for shortcuts. Start doing the hard (and much more interesting) work of caring about people and connecting with them authentically.

Instead of getting, focus on attracting.

3 Steps to Attracting People to Your List of Followers

Content Crimes: How You’re Misbehaving Online

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As I wrote last week, you could waste a lot of time online if you’re not paying attention.

Let’s look at this subject a little closer so that we’re not just looking at where you’re wasting time, but at how you’re harming your art career goals.

My friend, Cynthia, calls them content crimes. Nobody is going to throw you in jail for committing these transgressions, but you might check yourself into rehab when you decide to do something about it.

Here are the top 4 content crimes you might be committing.

Content Crime #1: You’re inconsistent.

You sent a newsletter for a few months and then nothing. Nada. The big zippo.

You tried blogging for a while … um … whenever you felt like it.

You heard that artists were selling art from Facebook, so you built a business page and put a few pictures up. It’s just not working for me, you claimed. Waste of time.

If you are truly excited about your art, you’ll share it repeatedly, even if you think nobody is listening, because you believe in yourself. You don’t give up.

If you do give up, I’m led to believe …

Stop Wasting Time on Social Media

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Are you wasting time on social media sites?

I’m not implying that you shouldn’t be on those sites. I’m just wondering if you’re using them to their potential.

It’s not that you need to be posting and sharing more. It’s that you should make sure your ROI (return on investment) is worth it for you. In other words, you should invest in quality, not quantity.

If you don’t, you might be wasting time.

Mindful sharing will bring you more friends, more shares, and more likes, which results in more people to buy your art or to offer you opportunities.

Here are some tips to help ensure that you’re spending time wisely online.

34 Marketing Insights from the Authority Rainmaker Conference

Marketing Insights from the Authority Rainmaker Conference

It’s a Memorial Day tradition at Art Biz Coach to offer a list of reminders for your art business.

This is a twist on that tradition.

With inspiration from the stage of Copyblogger’s Authority Rainmaker conference, I opened up my notes and share my biggest takeaways with you.

The thing to remember about live events, books, and even online classes is that not everything shared is going to apply to you. You’re either not ready to receive it, you’re past its relevance in your growth, or it doesn’t match your business model.

You have to look for the nuggets in these situations. I find that there is usually at least one thing from each talk, lesson, or chapter that is worth the investment.

Here are some of the highlights worth remembering.

What’s The Point of Making Art When The World Is So Screwed Up?

Why Make Art

If you’ve ever questioned the reason for making art, you’re not alone.

After a particularly rough time, you might catch yourself asking, “What’s the point?” You might even begin to see your work as frivolous.

With so much bad news being printed and broadcasted, it’s easy to overlook the bigger picture. These thoughts might enter your head:

Shouldn’t I be out there saving people?

Shouldn’t I be waging peace and protecting the environment?

These are noble pursuits, but are they why you, in all of your magnificence, were put on earth?

After being asked these questions by a number of students and clients, I thought of at least eight reasons why you should be making art.

8 of the Biggest Mistakes Artists Make in their Art Careers

Are you making these mistakes in your art career?

You might be making mistakes in your art business that are holding you back from big growth.

Mistakes aren’t bad, and I don’t want you to feel like you have to be perfect in everything you do because seeking perfection is a sure way to be paralyzed by fear. We have to make mistakes in order to learn and to grow.

Mistakes are only detrimental if you keep repeating them without learning and correcting your ways.

Are you making any of these mistakes?

1. Not knowing where you want to go with your career.

I’m not talking about the need to have a specific plan, but I’ve noticed how few artists, especially when they’re just starting out, don’t “get” that running a business is serious stuff. You’re no longer making art for pure pleasure.

Everything changes when you start asking for money in return for your talents. For some artists, it changes for the better and you’re fired up to get your art out there. Other artists can’t stomach the pressure and lose all interest in making art. They can’t seem to get into the studio.

The Case For Focusing Your Creative Energy and How To Do It

the case for focusing your art

You have so many ideas. You’re full of creativity and ready to apply it to any material you come across.

You paint for the pleasure, you paint commissioned work, you make jewelry, you snap photos, and you teach. You know who you are. You’re going 90 miles an hour in every direction with your hair on fire.

People say you should focus – pick one thing and get on with it.

There’s that “s” word again: should. Beware of this word. I’ve been guilty of using it a lot myself, but I’m becoming increasingly aware of how dangerous it is.

The only thing you should do is to be in integrity with your goals, your purpose, and your vision. How this manifests itself in your life is a delicate negotiation between you and the Universe.

There is, however, a reasonable argument to be made for concentrating your creative energy in one area.

The Case for Focusing Your Art

When your work is moving in multiple directions simultaneously, at least four problems arise.

Good and Bad News: Your Work Is Never Done

Your Work is Never Done

Newsflash! You’re just getting started.

Whether you think this is good news or bad news depends on your disposition.

Some people feel fulfilled and complete every day. I envy them.

I want more. Not more “stuff,” but more out of life. More experiences, more love, more friends, more cats. (Only kidding about that last one!)

I know it’s not fashionable these days to want more. They say I should be content where I am and live in the moment. Can’t I want more and appreciate the present?