The Business Media Wants to Know about Your Art BUSINESS

As I mentioned earlier, I attended a terrific panel discussion yesterday with media representatives covering the business arena. They were:

Darrell Proctor, Technology Editor, Rocky Mountain News
Bill Clarke, Reporter, Channel 7, KMGH-TV
Al Lewis, Business Columnist, The Denver Post
Bruce Goldberg, Associate Editor/Strategies, Denver Business Journal
Robert Schwab, Editor, Colorado Biz Magazine

As far as I can gather, some of these business writers and editors might be interested in the following artist stories:

  • ”Big eBay Sales Force Artist to Create Three Works Each Day”
  • ”Artist Uses Webcame to Invite Public into Studio"
  • ”Artist Group Redevelops of a Former Industrial Plant”
  • ”Three Generations of Artists Keep Glass Foundry Alive”
  • ”Artist’s Sales Soar after Controversial Poster Introduced”

Get the point? Business writers want to know about your BUSINESS, not necessarily the intricacies of your art.

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5 comments to The Business Media Wants to Know about Your Art BUSINESS

  • I left a beautiful home and 3 year marriage in Oregon to move to beautiful Mendocino and open a gallery in a watertower, with attached apartment over the store next door and a fantastic view of the headlands. Build it and they will come, right? Not. I think the price of gas affects our visitor populace. People do come here and have kept me in rent for two whole months now, and everyone who sees my work OOHs and AAHs and tells me how beautiful it is, but they don’t buy. Why? My prices are certainly reasonable (100-5000) and the gallery is cute, clean, uncluttered, etc. Any advice?

  • Do you try to connect with you customers and find out what they want? What is your genre? Is it popular, is it marketable, and are you willing to negotiate? Many artists are afraid to “push” their own art and why the customer should desire it – I know I am; but go beyond that and impart to the potential customers why you like the art and what it means to you and relate that to why they would like to have it in their home as well. It doesn’t have to be a hard sell but it does have to be a sell, once they have ownership of an artwork it is a treasure to them and should be presented as such. I read a little about gallery selling and once a customer is interested in a peice, concentrate on that specific artwork and don’t show them everything in the gallery so they’re distracted form their object of interest. Hope that helps a little bit.

  • Do you try to connect with you customers and find out what they want? What is your genre? Is it popular, is it marketable, and are you willing to negotiate? Many artists are afraid to “push” their own art and why the customer should desire it – I know I am; but go beyond that and impart to the potential customers why you like the art and what it means to you and relate that to why they would like to have it in their home as well. It doesn’t have to be a hard sell but it does have to be a sell, once they have ownership of an artwork it is a treasure to them and should be presented as such. I read a little about gallery selling and once a customer is interested in a peice, concentrate on that specific artwork and don’t show them everything in the gallery so they’re distracted form their object of interest. Hope that helps a little bit.

  • Do you try to connect with you customers and find out what they want? What is your genre? Is it popular, is it marketable, and are you willing to negotiate? Many artists are afraid to “push” their own art and why the customer should desire it – I know I am; but go beyond that and impart to the potential customers why you like the art and what it means to you and relate that to why they would like to have it in their home as well. It doesn’t have to be a hard sell but it does have to be a sell, once they have ownership of an artwork it is a treasure to them and should be presented as such. I read a little about gallery selling and once a customer is interested in a peice, concentrate on that specific artwork and don’t show them everything in the gallery so they’re distracted form their object of interest. Hope that helps a little bit.

  • Do you try to connect with you customers and find out what they want? What is your genre? Is it popular, is it marketable, and are you willing to negotiate? Many artists are afraid to “push” their own art and why the customer should desire it – I know I am; but go beyond that and impart to the potential customers why you like the art and what it means to you and relate that to why they would like to have it in their home as well. It doesn’t have to be a hard sell but it does have to be a sell, once they have ownership of an artwork it is a treasure to them and should be presented as such. I read a little about gallery selling and once a customer is interested in a peice, concentrate on that specific artwork and don’t show them everything in the gallery so they’re distracted form their object of interest. Hope that helps a little bit.