Keep Up Your Artist’s Journal for 21 Days

Confession: I wrote today’s Art Marketing Action newsletter on starting a journal in order to give me impetus to do it myself. I’ve been slacking on the journal front, probably because I have to write a lot anyway. But keeping a journal is very different from writing for public eyes. As I said, there is great value in journaling.

  • There are no rules.
  • You write only for yourself.
  • Most of all, you get the words out of your head and free up room for creativity.

I’m going to heed my words and commit here and now to writing in my journal every day for the next 21 days. Anyone care to join me in the challenge? They say if you do something for 21 days, it becomes a habit.

Send to Kindle

7 comments to Keep Up Your Artist’s Journal for 21 Days

  • Joe

    I accept your challenge! I keep a journal but usually only write 2 or 3 times per week. I’ve never considered myself much of a writer, and sometimes I have a hard time deciding what to write in my journal. But once I start, the ideas keep flowing, and I end up working out problems that I wasn’t even aware of (consciously): everything from technical aspects of oil painting to musings on things like why I like to paint. The act of writing always inspires more ideas. So now I’ll see how I hold up with 21 days of journaling.

  • I have been journal writing for the past 20 years. And I can’t say enough good things about doing it. My time that I spend each morning with my journal and pen is the most special time I have each day. I started with the aritst way, julia camerons book and haven’t stopped since. I also have a journal in my studio to jot down what ever needs to be. My journal is my closes friend it helps me to “know thyself”.

  • I know you said no rules but you speak of writing – is it a writing only challenge? I have kept a journal everyday for 15 years so it is a well established habit (worthwhile doing) I have found that it is the combination of imagery and words that is most profitable. Just ‘back of the envelope’ ideas and the like. Not necessarily anything finnished or a great time commitment but ideas noted nevertheless. I also make an active commitment to observing something and write about it everyday – rather than just reflecting on my own life and recording my day. It’s those observations or reflections on contemporary society that have proved to be the most interesting to return to.

  • Yes, Sharon, my intent was to focus on the writing. The imagery comes easily for most artists, but the words are what needs practice. As long as you get enough words down, the images are just a bonus, yes?

  • Carol Morgan

    I am a handmade paper artist who constructs journals from left over decorative artwork. As a counselor in private practice, I teach journal making and speak about the importance of continuing a personal dialogue. Insight immerges, connections are made and healing happens. Write without censuring. Set aside a special time of day, quite your wandering mind and write what appears, or draw or scribble. Touch your inner voice.

  • Tracy

    I’ve journaled on and off for many years. I’ve truly enjoyed it, but always seem to run into the same problem: I could go on for hours journaling about anything and everything, many times putting off what I need to get done or difficult creative issues I need to tackle by actually doing (not writing). Can’t figure out if I really havesomething to get out or if i use it as an excuse to put off what needs to get done.

  • This is something I really need to get better at. I keep a personal one for back-and-forthing with friends, but I’ve neglected the art blog for nearly a year. Shameful, I need to remedy that.