If 2 heads are better than one . . .

just imagine what 10 heads together can accomplish!

On Tuesday I had 9 artists come over and help me with what my book will look and feel like. As you can see, we sat around the living room and looked through a lot of books (you’re not even seeing a quarter of them).

Artistgettogether

Why didn’t I think of this sooner? I’m always encouraging artists to form strategic alliances and here I’ve been working in a bubble for almost two years.

The result is that the input was more valuable than I could have ever imagined. (The comments left on the blog have also been so helpful!)

Two heads are always better than one. Yes, I open myself up for criticism and stuff I don’t want to hear when I ask for opinions, but I get ideas–really good ideas–that I never would have thought of on my own. I dislike the fact that I can’t work with everyone’s ideas, but people understand. Rather than giving up control of my book, I’m bringing others into the process. I’m giving them a stake in the final product.

Moral of the story: Get involved. Seek input from others. Freshen your perspective. Start an ArtBizConnection.com marketing salon (all materials are 100% free of charge).

Thanks to: David Castle, Denise Bellon West, Lisa Call, Cynthia Guajardo, Jan Fordyce, Laura Tyler, Jim DeLutes, Ann Cunningham, and Dan Bahn. (Special thanks to Denise for this picture.)

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6 comments to If 2 heads are better than one . . .

  • You’re right. Group energy can be whole lot of fun. I enjoyed meeting everyone on Tuesday and can’t wait to see the finished book. (Especially the cover!) Congratulations and thank you for the wonderful work you’re doing on behalf of artists.

  • I enjoyed meeting everyone too and am looking forward to your book being on the store shelves soon!

  • Oh what a good idea! I wish I lived 1500 miles closer so I could have come too! I am eager to see the book! ~ Diane Clancy http://www.dianeclancy.com/blog

  • Sue

    Allyson, I am starting to feel manipulated here. You are a marketing expert and I can see that what you’re doing is building up anticipation and enthusiasm for your book so that when it finally comes out, it will sell well. Frankly, I’m getting annoyed at this tactic. You’re talking about it too much, making too much of the title, the cover, etc. etc. Sorry, it’s beginning to feel like marketing run amok. I wish you good luck with the book, but please, stop pushing it at us. I enjoy your newsletters and your blog, but this is starting to dampen my enthusiasm.

  • Sue: Sorry you feel this way. I have been very careful to continue to offer all of the other free stuff–including the newsletter, podcast, and numerous resources on the blog–I give readers every week while I work on the book. I think I counted 6 mentions of the book in the last 32 posts. I’d be a terrible marketing advisor if I mentioned it any less. I don’t think it’s fair to ask me not to mention my book amid all of the information I’m giving away. It’s like if I were to visit your blog and and ask you not to write about your art. The book is a huge part of what I’m doing right now, so I will continue to write about it. Not only that, but I need artists’ (including your) input. I think it is what makes my work different.

  • Play It Again, Sam

    Alyson Stanfield had a post the other day about If 2 heads are better than one . . . as she is asking artists for help in designing her new book. So I guess I can ask too thank you!!