Journey juju and supporting an artist’s creative adventure of a lifetime

Travelshines4
My coach, Cynthia Morris, is embarking on the journey of a lifetime–heading out for months (maybe longer) to explore her writing and embark on new creative pursuits. But something seems to have gone awry in the process. She can’t stop making these darn travel shrines! (They’re the only match boxes you can carry on a plane.) And she’s started a whole new blog where you can follow along on her travels: Journey JuJu.

Me and my travel shrine

I’m all for good travel mojo–especially with all of the hassles these days. So I signed on and have my own travel shrine. In fact, I’m now part of the travel shrine movement. (Did you hear about it?) Here’s a pic of my shrine at 25,000 feet on my way back to Denver on Wednesday. My seat mate didn’t mind because I had an empty seat next to me. How’s that for good journey juju?!
Shrines

Get this . . . my last trip I didn’t have the shrine with me and is the time I had my camera stolen. I learned my lesson. That shrine is going on all my trips now. Whatever it takes.

Travelshrines3
Be part of the artist’s journey

The coolest thing is that Cynthia is selling these shrines for just $24.95 and offering free shipping when you buy right now. By buying them, you create extra special karma because you are supporting an artist on her creative adventure. Not only that, a portion of the proceeds go to support an entrepreneur in the developing world through Kiva. That’s got to be awesome karma you can use for all of your trips–be they to the grocery store or to a distant land.

Cynthia’s travel shrines reminded me of Karen Bubb’s story of creative financing for her trip to China, which is documented in I’d Rather Be in the Studio! on pages 215-217.

Consider supporting an artist and getting good journey juju in return.

Send to Kindle

9 comments to Journey juju and supporting an artist’s creative adventure of a lifetime

  • How fabulous. They remind me of Peruvian nativity matchboxes. I always carry my toys with me on the plane: a mini watercolor set, pencils, a glue stick, those cool, new-ish brushes that have a teaspoon of water in the base so you don’t need to carry water… Everything is, of course, in the required ziplock. Unfortunately I rarely open that ziplock since I also carry my laptop, and reading, usually start out doing paper work,journaling and then degenerate into drooling naps… How fabulous to have a mini-goal of creativity to undertake on the plane. I’m headed to Spain for an artists residency in May and will carefully select my art materials for the flight. The challenge is on.

  • Luggage Forward is a service that picks up & delivers your bags before you yourself travel…(a concierge will call to say your bags have arrived)…On My Way is a new around $25 optional surcharge some airlines are adding, that will provide above & beyond service if your flight is delayed or cancelled…& will somebody tell or send Naomi Campbell a travel shrine? Although, my mum just went through Heathrow too, & now her bags are in the 28,000 sitting in a warehouse in Milan…(maybe Naomi is right this time)…

  • “Strike-anywhere Matches – One book of safety (non-strike anywhere) matches are permitted as carry-on items, but all matches are prohibited in checked baggage.” just an afterthought…

  • Yep, Sari. But not match boxes like these.

  • She is selling them for $24.95 with FREE shipping? This is the part I don’t understand. There are hours of work in these shrines. With the cost of materials and shipping, along with the time it takes to make them, how is there a reasonable profit? I just don’t get it.

  • Sheree, Thanks for this post. You forgot to mention that $5.00 from each shrine will be contributing to an entrepreneur via Kiva.org, so the profit is whittled away even more. Here’s the deal: I didn’t make these to make a huge profit. I did spend some time costing out the materials and worked to make those as cost-effective as possible. Regarding my time, it’s inestimable. I spent so many hours researching materials, putting these together, thinking about them, just as any artist does. But I’m not trying to make a living from shrine making. I just want to fund my plane ticket! I also can’t calculate the thousands of hours writing my novel during the last nine years. I’m hoping it will be published. It may not. Will I ever recoup my efforts on that book even if it sells well? Who knows. Art making is first and foremost about making art because you have to, because you love it, because you are compelled to. I can’t tell you how much fun I had with these shrines and how much I love them! I think they’re awesome. Yet sales are slow, I wonder if I’ve priced them too high, and I wonder if people don’t ‘get’ them. I imagine that many artists go through this when they put their work out into the world. I am not advocating that artists not be savvy about pricing. For the work I do in my business, I charge fair market value and make sure I am compensated for my time and for the value I offer for my clients. My shrines are another thing and for the moment, I am not trying to make a living from my art. That’s why I’m so grateful for Alyson’s work. Pairing marketing and business savvy with our creativity gives us a better chance at success. I appreciate your comment. It’s helpful for all of us to think about pricing and value. Even more helpful – buy a shrine! ::)

  • it’s the phosphorus on the box or the tips that is considered dangerous…as long as the matchboxes don’t have the phosphorus, they are fine…

  • Sheree, great question! I am so glad Cynthia responded because I think it’s important to understand that her goals are very different. And I know she enjoyed hearing that you thought they were priced too low!

  • Cynthia is really putting her creative talents to work…a clever way to finance her European travels. I wish her happy trails! Want to develop those creative thinking skills, create a memorable travel journal and explore a tropical land the “native way”? A review from Joan D. a 2008 Explore & Create in Costa Rica participant: “Through Jan Yatsko’s sensitive eyes, I gained a wonderful insight to this exciting tropical country, it’s ancient and present-day cultures, people, sights, sounds and tastes. Her introduction to the wonders of art travel journaling, sketching daily images and creative thinking is something I’m going to enjoy using in all my future travels. A highly recommended and awakening experience. Pura Vida!”