More reminders for your art career

Remember that you will be challenged more by artists who work in media other than your own. It’s all fine and good to hang out at the Clay Guild, the Oil Painter Society, or the Metalsmiths Association, but you need to expand every so often. Enter non-media-specific exhibits and join organizations that aren’t media-focused.

Remember to stop sending boring, ineffective emails. Other artists are doing enough in this area to free you up to be more creative with your messages.

Remember that people love to laugh. Be funny as often as you can!

Remember to be a little vulnerable. We learn more from hearing stories about failures than we do about success stories. Sharing these experiences (sparingly) makes you human.

Remember that people will constantly surprise you. You’ll be amazed at the things they pick up on that you thought were mere footnotes in your story.

Mcintyre
©Carol A. McIntyre, Over the Hill

Remember that just because one or two artists might have had decent sales from a new idea doesn’t mean that you should follow suit. If it’s been done, it’s probably not news. Change it, turn it upside down, tear it apart, and make it your own in order for it to generate a buzz.

Remember to challenge yourself with your art and with your marketing ideas. Art is all about new ideas.

- – >These reminders evolved from my keynote address to the Studio Art Quilt Associates annual meeting in Athens, Ohio on May 23. They are a continuation of the Memorial Day "Remember" theme.

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2 comments to More reminders for your art career

  • Alyson;
    Thank you for featuring my art today! What a lovely surprise on a dreary (rainy weather again) day.

    Per your comment about seeking out artists in other media, I could not agree more. Last week I met with a writer and then I witnessed Joshua Bell’s genious on the violin. Both were inspiring.

  • Very effective set of ‘reminders’ for any artist who is already in the business or is just beginning. I also think that the notion of expanding into other media can be incredibly exciting, not to mention a great way to see which of your art skills are more transferable between media than others. The excellent sketch artist, for example, can find himself/herself in an animating studio rather quickly after learning a bit about software and the associated peripherals.