Greatest Hits (Posts) of 2009

In case you missed any posts during the last 12 months, I’ve selected one from each month to call your attention to. Here they are: The Greatest Hits from the Art Biz Blog from 2009.

Offer an Upgrade
Upgrades not only bring you more money, they also provide your fans with another level of service.

Dating Your Art: How Important is It?
Dating your artwork is critical if you’re interested in high-end galleries and museums.

How long did it take you to make your art?
Artists love to hate this question they hear from buyers and customers. And, yet, you continue to hear it over and over again. Read this post and the 80 comments (perhaps the most ever!) it received at the time. Then read the winning responses to the question.

Leah Virsik

Leah Virsik, Genesis, 2009. Acrylic, paper, beeswax, 11 x 11 inches. ©The Artist


Return to Your Art

Never neglect the studio. Always return to your art. The disciplined practice of making art is mandatory.

Recycle Your Blog Posts into Exhibit Labels
Guest Blogger Val Littlewood shows you how (and why!) she did it.

Identify (only) the Next Action
Clearly define your tasks and identify only the next action for your task list.

Ask for Sponsorship
This post didn’t receive any comments, but it’s crucial if you ever need to ask anyone to contribute services or goods for an opening or event.

Using Other Artists’ Images on Your Blog
How to use others’ images the right way and gain friends at the same time.

Escape the PMWP (Poor Me Whining Phenomenon)
Nobody is responsible for your success–or lack thereof–except you. Of course, there will always be bumps along the road that are not your fault. Get a good set of shocks and ride out the potholes.

Artist Salons: 6 Elements for a Thriving Group (Part 1)
Any artist can start a group, but how can you ensure it will thrive? How can you make it worth the members’ time? Also read: Part 2.

Crediting Your Artwork
Every artist needs to read this! Whether you post your images on a blog, a website, or on a social media site like Facebook, you need to give yourself credit for your artwork.

Finish Off the Sale and Follow Up
Give your art buyers only what they need at the time of the sales transaction and save the rest for following up at a future date.

When You’re Not Getting Paid after the Sale of Your Art
If you’re not being paid by a gallery you know is making sales, your reaction should depend on the answers you give for the five questions in this article.

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7 comments to Greatest Hits (Posts) of 2009

  • Alyson, thank you very much for the feature of my artwork! Your “Crediting Your Artwork” post was super valuable to me. Your “Artist Salons: 6 Elements for a Thriving Group” post link was moved but it reminds me how valuable it was for me to host your Art Marketing Salon. I really enjoyed meeting new people. It really helped that your information was simple and easy to follow. This made it much easier for me to lead.

  • Leah: Sorry about that bad link. Just fixed it! I appreciate your telling us about your salon experience–and for sharing your art here.

  • kat

    thanks Alyson, for the valuable information you collected from your posts. i liked what so many had to say regarding the post on how much time it takes to create our work…there’s some good advice there!

  • Couldn’t/wouldn’t you please make it a baker’s dozen? :)M

  • Kat: My readers are very wise!

    Marilyn: Actually, there are indeed 13 posts there. There’s one entry with two parts to it. Happy to oblige!

  • What a great collection of tips for the New Year! I will refer back to this post many times I’m sure. Thanks for the great advice!
    - Jennifer

  • Brilliant words of wisdom. Have booked marked this post for reference in the new year. Thanks for sharing.