Don’t Miss the Kodak Moments of Your Art Career

Shirley Williams Gallery Sign

I’ve been thinking a lot about taking more interesting photos that stand out online. That means I’ve been noticing “different” photos as I come across them. Noticing and appreciating them.

Shirley Williams recently revamped her already-handsome website and added rotating images to her home page. The above image stood out in that set. It shows her gallery’s name with her name underneath the word “Exhibition.”

Shirley doesn’t need for people to wade through the credentials on her résumé. This image says it all.

Plan to Take Photos at Your Art Exhibit or Event

It’s awful to wake up the day after an opening, workshop, or art show and think of all the photos you wish you had taken. Plan to shoot the photos you’ll wish you had later.

Take pictures of:

  1. People looking at your art
  2. You talking with viewers, students, collectors, and passersby
  3. Party pics (smiling at the camera) of you and your VIPs
  4. You with the curator or gallery director
  5. You with other artists
  6. You in front of the exhibit title
  7. You in front of the sign to the gallery
  8. Your name in lights (like Shirley’s photo above)

Carry a small notebook to note spellings of names and, if necessary, correct titles.

Enlist Your Friends

Enlist your closest friends to take pictures for you.  Encourage people to take photos with their iPhones and email the pictures to you.

Stage the photos if you need to. “Action shots” aren’t always the most usable.

Have a stack of your business cards handy. If you see people snapping photos, hand them your card and ask them to send you copies.

Are you capturing the Kodak moments? If you think you have an intriguing photo to share, leave a link in a comment so we can check it out.

 

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11 comments to Don’t Miss the Kodak Moments of Your Art Career

  • What a brilliant idea! Love it!

  • Caryl Hancock

    Too true! A few years ago, I was invited to put on a runway fashion show of my wearables. My garments/commentary were to be the pre-luncheon entertainment for a fundraiser. Though I tried to get the group to include other wearable artists, they were firm – they just wanted me! To this day, I regret not having hired a professional videographer for the event; those opportunities are seldom repeated, and at the time I was just too “cheap!”

  • This absolutely rings true! I always have such good intentions of taking photos but I get so involved with the high spirit of the moment that the camera either doesn’t come out at all or I just have a few weak shots. I like the idea of enlisting a friend to be the photographer for the evening. I have an exhibit coming up in June and will make a note to get this handled!! thanks for the suggestions.

  • I am a photo addict and I agree that you don’t have to miss Kodak moments in your art career. Taking pictures in different views, in different occasions etc. tells a lot! Every shot tells thousands of words so don’t ever miss to bring your camera with you when you’re out. I always love photo exhibition, each photo tells something.. :)

  • I had my “Kodak moment” two weeks ago. My daughter managed to take photos. You can see it here: http://www.elleprimeau.blogspot.com/ on the blog entry for April 6, 2011. My painting “Nick” won first place in the “Working Class Heroes: A Tribute” exhibit at the Scarab Club, in Detroit, MI

  • I am having my first major solo show at our territorial Museum and I have hired a photographer to take photos. I forwarded him your post so that we cover all the basis. Don’t know when I will have another show at the Museum so we thought it was worth the money to hire someone who isn’t visiting!!!