Being Heard Above the Noise

You not only need ideas for your art, but also for content in newsletters, blog posts, and social media updates.

Artists trying to connect with others online are also content-generators.

Dawn Brose-Jerome, One Step at a Time. Watercolor on paper.

Dawn Brose-Jerome, One Step at a Time. Watercolor on paper, 22.5 x 30 inches. ©The Artist

How do you come up with something to say that is worthy of being heard above the noise?

Step 1
The first step to generating ideas is to identify your audience.

Step 2
Identify your purpose for connecting through these platforms.

Step 3
Listen to your ideal audience.

Step 4
Finally, mind map your content on paper.

Mind maps and content ideas are part of the Blog Triage Self-Study. If your blog is one of the many out there that needs a little TLC, check it out.

How do you generate content ideas in order to be heard above the noise?

This is an excerpt from the Art Biz Insider newsletter. Subscribe here for in-depth articles.
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6 comments to Being Heard Above the Noise

  • I listen to needs…Then I try to solve them…Then I publish where the people that needed me might see the answers…(ie: I read about a new tuberculosis detector that you blow into…I tried to figure out how people could treat their symptoms now without going to a doctor if they couldn’t afford it…I wrote a blog post at groveontario.wordpress.com so locals could read it…I Twitter-ed the link…I also commented back on the original article in the online newspaper…

  • Excellent strategy, Sari. One point I’d add is to make sure that you are using keywords (the words that people enter into Google) so that the interested parties will actually find what you’re writing about and thus your solution to their problem.

  • hi Alyson-
    all very true – we need to do many tasks, like be our own PR agent.
    I get many great ideas by listening~ and watching how more experienced people navigate this terrain. When I read an article, blog post, review, often I think how did this person make themselves newsworthy? What perspective did they use? Now with the internet it is easier to connect with people, join them on twitter, become part of their tribe. I think it is important to connect with others if you hope for them to highlight your work, reciprocal communication is the way.

  • Thanks Marnie Hughes for the suggestion… I sort of knew a little about the keyword idea, but just went to ‘Google Adwords Keywords Suggestions’ to find out more about what keywords mean…What was neat was I typed in the word tuberculosis & it comes up in their tool that it is a low competition word, meaning not alot of sites about that, but like 4 million people use that keyword in a month…So people want to know about that…A neat thought would maybe be to go to that search tool, type in what you want to write about & see if there is competition on that keyword & also how many people are looking for answers…That could be a way to decide if your blog topic is needed or not…?

  • Hi, this post is so important for me. I always need to be really clear on what I am providing/intending to provide before I speak (I think it’s an introvert thing, where only when it’s crisp and clear inside it can be “birthed” toward others’ ears).
    What do you think of the idea of a questionnaire handed out during an open studio event? Questions would be e.g.:” What would you like to hear about in upcoming newsletter? ” All participants will be entered into a raffle drawing for a small piece of art as an incentive.

  • Hi Alyson,
    As a practicing artist and teacher, I look at I’d Rather Be In The Studio all the time, and recommend it high and low. I also recommend your blog and newsletter. Just two weeks ago at a Meet The Artist talk at CWU in Ellensburg, I put your website and book in my PPT show. Today’s newsletter/blog inspired me to share your resources yet again!