Share the Stage to Make Fast Fans

spotlight on stage

Doesn’t it feel good when other people say nice things about you and your art? It’s easy to pass along this sensation to those you care about. Sharing the stage and shining the spotlight on other people will turn them into fast fans while taking some of the weight off of you to promote your work all of the time. It will also make you feel good!

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Email Marketing for Artists: A Compilation

SEND-email

Last week I pulled together an Art Biz Blog compilation on email blasts for a client. No reason to keep it secret! First, this is really good, basic advice that you should never take for granted: Slow Down and Get Your Email Blast Right. Next

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Promoting Events 6 Months Out

At my social media immersion workshop in Philadelphia. Photo by John Pitman Photography, ©John J. Pitman. Used with permission.

If I were asked for advice on promoting my workshops, these are the actions I’d encourage organizers to take. Please use this format as a guideline and adapt it to any event.

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Would You Benefit From Using a Different Artist Name?

It's hard to change your name once you have started exhibiting. Get clear on how you want to go down in the history books.

The arguments against using your given name are 1) that it’s difficult to spell or pronounce or 2) that it’s too common. Do you see how these two problems are exact opposites: one is too hard and the other too easy.

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How to Get Students to Visit Your Site

After the workshop, perhaps 5 days later, I send all students an email with a link to a special page just for them. This page has about 20 additional, highly relevant resources. I opt for doing it this way because:

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What Papa Taught Me About Selling Art from the Trunk of His Car

Charles Pannage Sculpture

Papa didn’t care for any art other than his own and didn’t know the “rules” of the art world. Heck, he didn’t even know there was an art world! Getting into a gallery never entered his thoughts. He just drove around with a trunk full of sculptures to show to people.

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What is a contact list?

The definition of a mailing list should be expanded and reconsidered as a “contact list.” Social media puts you in touch with all kinds of people that aren’t on your traditional mailing list.

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The first 4 steps toward selling your art: Step #3

John McCaskill, . 26 x 38 inches. ©The Artist

Being around other artists builds your confidence and sustains you emotionally. In addition, you will hear about opportunities you never knew existed if you hadn’t been part of a group. You’ll hear about them before they are ever published! Read more about why you should connect with other artist–especially at the beginning of your career–and how to do it.

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Get people to sell your art for you

Artists are telling me all the time that they wish they had someone else to promote and sell their work for them. Guess what? You can get other people to sell your art quickly and easily!

All you have to do is create an affiliate program.

An affiliate program is a system for referrals. Someone refers a friend, family member or colleague to your art, and you pay them a referral fee when that person buys something from you. Instead of paying a gallery or retail outlet, you’re paying a friend–someone who is part of your artist community and someone you might like to reward.

Sherrie York, In the Shadows (Ptarmigan). Reduction color linocut. 18 x 12 inches. ©The Artist

Here are five thoughts on creating an affiliate program . . .

1. Target your fans. You want affiliates to

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Pitch your story to magazines

We looked at brochures last week, and I imagine that many of you decided you didn’t need a brochure–at least not right now. There are any number of ways you can share your art outside of a fancy brochure. And, as I said in the last issue, you want to target your message as much as possible, especially if it’s for a promising lead or media outlet.

Laura K. Aiken asks:

Let’s say I wanted to pitch an idea to a magazine. Whatever I sent them, I would want it to be interesting enough for them to put on the front cover or as a highlighted article. What is going to make me stand out from all the other artists?

First, I love this question. Laura realizes that she needs to stand out. A one-size-fits-all brochure won’t cut it in

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