Good and Bad News: Your Work Is Never Done

Your Work is Never Done

Newsflash! You’re just getting started.

Whether you think this is good news or bad news depends on your disposition.

Some people feel fulfilled and complete every day. I envy them.

I want more. Not more “stuff,” but more out of life. More experiences, more love, more friends, more cats. (Only kidding about that last one!)

I know it’s not fashionable these days to want more. They say I should be content where I am and live in the moment. Can’t I want more and appreciate the present?

Say No Without the Guilt

Say no without guilt

When someone asks something of you, there are a couple of ways you can respond: Yes or No.

When you say yes to everything, you are probably saying no to yourself and many of your art goals. You are saying that what someone is asking or offering is more important than your agenda.

You can’t even do everything that’s on your list right now, so how do you ensure that your art business remains a priority when so many people are asking for your time?

Art Critics Really Said This

art critics Roberta Smith (New York Times) and Jerry Saltz (New York Magazine)

Last week I sat in the audience and listened to husband-and-wife art critics Roberta Smith (New York Times) and Jerry Saltz (New York Magazine). They were in town at the invitation of Denver’s Clyfford Still Museum. (The photo here was taken from my seat.)

What struck me most was not just how much art they see (a ton), but the wide variety of art that interests them. They go to show after show after show, and then they want to see more. They never tire of looking at art. Saltz confessed to looking for all-night galleries to satisfy their obsession.

You might be tempted to discount critics, but you would be wrong not to listen to people who have spent decades looking at artist after artist, exhibition after exhibition, and style after style.

Much of this dynamic duo’s conversation

Why Aren’t You Motivated?

©2014 Diane Gabriel, Young Girl With Icon, Nah Trang, Viet Nam. Pigment print. Used with permission.

I want to help you with your art business. Each blog post, class lesson, consultation, or live event is designed to help you get one step closer to your dream.

In these formats …

I can teach you what you should be doing to promote your art. I can teach you how to do things. I can teach you why it’s good to be doing these things. I can teach you about other artists getting good results.

But …

I cannot teach you how to get motivated to do the work.

©2014 Diane Gabriel, Young Girl With Icon, Nah Trang, Viet Nam. Pigment print. Used with permission.

I’d go so far as to say that I can’t teach you if you are not motivated. I could give you information, but that information is no good if it is merely

Celebrate Your Year: 2014 Personal Review

©Victoria Eubanks, Red Sticks & Stones. Encaustic, 24 x 24 inches. Used with permission.

You’re surely already thinking about and planning for the New Year.

But before you get too far into everything you want to do, take a moment to look back on what you accomplished in 2014. Time to celebrate!

©Victoria Eubanks, Red Sticks & Stones. Encaustic, 24 x 24 inches. Used with permission.

Prepare for your review by 1) setting aside time on your calendar for this process and 2) gathering any data you might need.

This might mean that your first step is updating your bookkeeping.

You also want to have your calendar handy so you can go through it month-by-month.

Expanding Your Profile

What did you do to enhance your professional reputation? How many people did you add to your mailing list? How many social media followers did you gain on the various platforms you use? Who

A Feast for the Eyes: Food in Art

©Sarah Atlee, Lunch at Sakagura. Acrylic and colored pencil on paper, 22 x 22 inches. Used with permission.

Wishing you a very Happy Thanksgiving – surrounded by people you love and filled with yummy food.

Here’s a no-calorie feast just for your eyes.

©Sylvia Tucker, Onions with Copper Bowl. Oil, 12 x 16 inches. Used with permission.

 

©Sarah Atlee, Lunch at Sakagura. Acrylic and colored pencil on paper, 22 x 22 inches. Used with permission.

 

©Jonathan Meter, Shishito Peppers with Lime. Photograph. Used with permission.

 

©Richard Hall, Heirlooms. Oil, 36 x 34 inches. Used with permission.

 

©2010 Karin Olah, Newton’s Daydream. Fabric, gouache, acrylic, and graphite on canvas, 36 x 12 inches. Used with permission.

 

©Sarah B. Hansen, Sunshine in a Box. Watercolor on Plexiglas, 30 x 22 inches. Used with permission.

Please share your gratitudes in a comment or even a link to your own

Schedule Something Scary and Extraordinary

©Joey Feldman, Vicious. Pen and ink on paper, 28 x 20 inches. Used with permission

It’s scary to step up – to think bigger about what you’re capable of.

There’s very little motivation in the daily grind: update Facebook, schedule a few tweets, send a newsletter, write a blog post, work in studio. If you’re not careful, you’ll continue to go through the motions of life without doing something extraordinary for your art and for yourself.

©Joey Feldman, Vicious. Pen and ink on paper, 28 x 20 inches. Used with permission.

In honor of the witching season, I ask you to scare yourself a little. Give yourself a challenge that motivates you to get out of bed and into the studio every day. Take on a quest.

Anatomy of a Quest (with Examples)

According to Chris Guillebeau, author of The Happiness of Pursuit: Finding the Quest That Will Bring Purpose to Your Life, a

Who You Are and What You Do

what-you-do-550

Alert subscriber Clay Cantrell sent me the quote in this image some months ago, saying that it reminded him of me.

The difference between who you are and who you want to be is what you do. [Tweet this.]

I tracked down the quote to, as best I can tell, fitness guru Bill Phillips.

I wanted to share this with you because I can’t think of a quote that is more inspirational for me right now, and I hope it serves you.

Who I Am

You know me as someone who is a no-excuse-action-taking-don’t-stop-working kinda gal. I have never had a problem taking action.

But that’s only a tiny part of WHO I want to be.

Who I Want To Be

Over the past few years, I have loosely been seeking some form of spirituality. “Seeking” isn’t really the

Notes From an Artist Lecture

Doug Casebeer

As I was flipping through my notebook last week, I came across notes from a lecture by ceramic artist Doug Casebeer at the Foothills Art Center in Golden, Colorado on January 25, 2014.

Doug Casebeer, Vessels. Image found without credit details on Northern Arizona University site.

There is so much wisdom here that I’ve decided to share them in their raw form. Enough time has passed since I first heard these words that I hope I am honoring Doug’s intent.

What The Artist Said

It’s difficult to wear the title artist. I prefer the title builder.

I seek to build community and friendships. This is the spirit of what the artist’s life is about.

When you have 150 artists going to the studio every day, stuff is going to happen.

The kiln is a social magnet.

When Takashi Nakazato

Entrepreneurial Freedom

M.G. Ferguson oil painting

Many people become entrepreneurs because of the freedom it affords them. When you own your own business, you are free to set your own goals, get out of bed when you like, and control your brand.

Of course, most people who seek this path of independence have no idea what they’re getting into. They don’t realize how much harder it is to be a successful entrepreneur than to clock in for an 8-to-5 job.

©MG Ferguson, Summer Walk Home. Oil on canvas, 10 x 8 inches. Used with permission.

Still, on this (almost) Independence Day holiday in the U.S, we should celebrate our entrepreneurial freedom and all the things we are free to do.

May you be . . .

Free to explore new creative ideas. To not be tied to the past. Tradition is a lovely place to