11 Artist Videos to Whet Your Appetite

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Your photos aren’t reaching as far as they used to on Facebook.

A number of marketing experts have recently pointed out that photos are the least likely to reach their audience on Facebook. Even links and plain status updates (sans links/photos) get more organic reach than photos.

What is working? Video! On average, videos are seen by 135% more people than photos.

And it’s not just on Facebook. Engaging videos can be a boon for your marketing regardless of where you post them.

So let’s look at some artists who have done a pretty good job with their videos. Some of these are self-produced and others are more professional, but you should be able to pick up a few tips from all of them.

Dionne Swift: Establishing a Rhythm

This professionally-produced video shows Dionne drawing inspiration from a beautiful

A Creative Idea for Unloading Earlier Art

gavel

There’s too much art hiding in studios, basements, and garages.

If you have a problem with overflowing inventory, especially a lot of earlier art that you aren’t excited about showing, how about finding new homes for that work? At the same time, you’ll create room for new art, support a good cause, and earn income.

Organize a Fundraiser

Yep, I’m talking about a fundraiser.

Now before you cut me off because you think I’m going to tell you to donate your art, hang tight. Just the opposite is true because you’re going to make money on this fundraiser.

There must be a cause that is close to your heart: animals, the environment, education, an art center. Pick one and ask a nonprofit organization to partner with you.

This partnership is key because the organization should have a solid list

Revitalize Old Content On Your Blog

revitalize old content on your blog | Art Biz Coach

This blog is more than ten years old. Blogs were different in 2004 before social media took off.

In the early years, I posted a lot of little snippets before Facebook and Twitter were the place for these. That means there’s a lot of crap on my blog. (I won’t link to it here because it’s going away, as you’ll see.)

If you’ve had a blog for a while, you might be faced with the same dilemma: What to do about old posts that have outlived their usefulness?

I started looking for posts that would either 1) embarrass me if someone landed on them or 2) lead readers astray with dead links or outdated information.

You can follow my revitalization process if you think it might serve you.

First, Review Google Analytics

What are your high-performing posts? While you

Art Critics Really Said This

art critics Roberta Smith (New York Times) and Jerry Saltz (New York Magazine)

Last week I sat in the audience and listened to husband-and-wife art critics Roberta Smith (New York Times) and Jerry Saltz (New York Magazine). They were in town at the invitation of Denver’s Clyfford Still Museum. (The photo here was taken from my seat.)

What struck me most was not just how much art they see (a ton), but the wide variety of art that interests them. They go to show after show after show, and then they want to see more. They never tire of looking at art. Saltz confessed to looking for all-night galleries to satisfy their obsession.

You might be tempted to discount critics, but you would be wrong not to listen to people who have spent decades looking at artist after artist, exhibition after exhibition, and style after style.

Much of this dynamic duo’s conversation

I Love Your Art But It's Not For Me

I love your art, but it's not for me | Art Biz Coach

You know the type.

She attends your show and tells you what a wonderful artist you are. This makes you feel good. You’re happy for people to connect with your work this way.

She comes to the next opening and gushes in a way that makes you blush.

She raves repeatedly about your art. I love your work! she says.

Yet, she never buys. She’s implying, I love your art, but it’s not for me.

What gives?

Exercise Your Courage Muscle

Who knows why people don’t buy. Maybe they don’t dig that yellow speck in the lower left. Or maybe they just emptied their bank account to pay for a root canal.

If not closing the sale is bothering you, maybe it’s time to exercise your courage muscle and ask the repeat fan why she’s not pulling out her

Why Aren’t You Motivated?

©2014 Diane Gabriel, Young Girl With Icon, Nah Trang, Viet Nam. Pigment print. Used with permission.

I want to help you with your art business. Each blog post, class lesson, consultation, or live event is designed to help you get one step closer to your dream.

In these formats …

I can teach you what you should be doing to promote your art. I can teach you how to do things. I can teach you why it’s good to be doing these things. I can teach you about other artists getting good results.

But …

I cannot teach you how to get motivated to do the work.

©2014 Diane Gabriel, Young Girl With Icon, Nah Trang, Viet Nam. Pigment print. Used with permission.

I’d go so far as to say that I can’t teach you if you are not motivated. I could give you information, but that information is no good if it is merely

Art Business Interest List on Facebook

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While you’re creating interest lists on Facebook to help you stay connected, how about adding an interest list for staying up-to-date on your art business.

You could start by adding the Art Biz Coach page. Just sayin’.

Here are the business pages on my art business interest list (just click that link to follow my list), though note that I also have individual profiles on my list as well.

Please leave your favorite art business pages on Facebook in a comment here.

Send to KindleSee These Posts, TooHow to Use Facebook Interest Lists for Your Art Business8 of the Biggest Mistakes Artists Make in their Art CareersBehind the Scenes: Rebranding Art Biz Coach22 Social Media Updates About Your Show That Won’t Bore…Prepare for 2015: 5 Things to

How to Use Facebook Interest Lists for Your Art Business

Facebook sidebar

Doesn’t it just get your goat that Facebook is keeping your business page posts from your fans?

Doesn’t it drive you batty that you don’t see posts from your favorite businesses in your feed anymore?

The reason for both of these is that Facebook thinks businesses should pay for exposure. I get that: Facebook is trying to run a business. I’ve ponied up more than a few bucks myself to the big blue F.

At the same time Facebook is keeping my business posts out of my followers’ feeds, they are making it hard for me to follow the businesses I love.

Facebook is also making it more difficult for you to become a presence on the pages of artists, galleries, and art organizations.

There is a way to hack this: create interest lists.

Interest lists will help you stay

Is Your Brand Missing You?

Dharma is exploring her new cat cave, but can’t quite commit to being all in. Are you all in on your brand?

At the mastermind retreats with my coach and mentor, everyone in the group receives a “hot seat,” where we are given the opportunity to tackle one big issue in our businesses.

For my hot seat, I chose to talk about my brand.

I drop a cat photo every so often as I share peeks of my everyday life. Dharma is exploring her new cat cave, but can’t quite commit to being all in. Are you all in on your brand?

To prepare the group, I reminded them of some of the websites and programs associated with my business:

Art Biz Coach (website and business name since 2002) Art Biz Blog (blog since 2004) Art Biz Makeover (live event) Art Biz Bootcamp (online class) Organize Your Art Biz (online class) Art Biz Lift Off (online class and self-study)

Curate a Solo Show of Your Art

Dora Ficher’s solo show “El Balle de Colores” at Gold Standard Café in Philadelphia, PA.

Are you still diddling around with juried shows or exhibitions with your art group?

There’s nothing wrong with either one of these as a starting point, but there comes a time when you have to leave the nest. You have to plan a solo exhibition.

Your career will grow rapidly when you start having solo exhibitions of your art.

Dora Ficher’s solo show “El Balle de Colores” at Gold Standard Café in Philadelphia, PA.

Solo shows are the pinnacle of an artist’s career, but in most artists’ dreams they usually take place at fine galleries and museums.

Those prestigious venues will happen for those who persevere. In the beginning, you will probably need to curate your solo show for less lofty places.

All possibilities are on the table: restaurants, private homes, rented storefronts, bank lobbies, salons, or your