Where and How Do You Retreat? (Curious Monday)

Sunset painting by Malcolm Dewey

It’s well proven that we need rest and relaxation for peak performance.

Artists need to get away or get out of their heads in order to be refreshed and newly inspired.

Enter the artist’s retreat.

You might have official getaways planned in the form of retreats. I often refer to Art Biz Breakthrough as a retreat because it allows you to get away from the daily grind and focus on business-building.

How do you get away from it all?

Do you have regular retreats planned? Where do you go? What do you see and do?

Do you plan weekly or monthly retreats?

What do those look like?

Please share in a comment below.

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Being Seen: The Social Part of the Artist’s Life

gibson-lisa-birds

Meeting people and building relationships is the most important thing you can do for your art career. This means you have to get out of the studio and socialize.

You must, gasp, be social in the real world as well as online.

This goes against the natural tendency of so many artists who would prefer to be alone with their art supplies. But it’s absolutely necessary when you want to attain a high level of success.

If you desire more sales and more recognition for your art, you must make it a priority to meet more people.

You need to get out and meet more people if you find yourself …

  • Sitting behind your computer all day and researching the latest magical way to promote your art online.
  • Attending only your own openings.
  • Living in the same place for years without knowing your neighbors.

Why This Matters

Your art must be seen in person in order to be appropriately appreciated. Eventually, you’re going to have to

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5 Ways to Follow Up with Students in Your Art Classes

jones-polly-plums

The follow-up process for students is different than that for buyers and collectors.

Once someone has studied with you, they are likely to take additional classes from you, which means it’s just as important to follow up with students as it is with your collectors – if you want to grow your class sizes and offerings.

You have to show students that you care before, during, and after the program they enroll in.

Here are five ways to do that.

1. Ask for Evaluations and Testimonials

Evaluations can help you improve your offerings while showing students that you care about the experiences they’ve had with you. You’re asking to hear their opinions.

Evaluations can also be a source of testimonials for your programs – if you ask the questions the right way.

Keep your evaluation short. I suggest some variation of these three questions:

What did you most enjoy about this class?

What was your

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Do You Reveal Your Politics? (Curious Monday)

Roseate Spoonbills painting by Allison Richter

Things are heating up in the presidential race and online.

And it’s getting nasty. One client asked me how I deal with reading about it all in my Facebook feed and I said, I don’t. I really don’t read my feed much. It’s too upsetting. I can connect with my students and clients through our private groups, where the energy is much more positive.

What’s right for you?

Do you take a stand publicly for your political opinions? (You don’t have to tell us what they are.)

Where do you draw the line?

Do you find yourself getting trapped in political conversations on social media?

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The Impatient Artist: Time and Your Art Career (Podcast)

Leslie Lee - artist painting a still life

With today’s post, we’re introducing a new feature: a monthly podcast.

My previous Art Marketing Action podcast was an audio version of the weekly newsletter, which you can still find online here and on iTunes.

I’m not sure what will happen in the future, but I am committed to deliver at least one content post a month in audio.

Are You Impatient About Your Art Career?

In this podcast, I talk with artist/author/coach Cynthia Morris about how to set up your art career for success – so that you’re in it for longevity, and not for instant gratification.

These topics came up (talk about thinking big!):

  • Legacy
  • Empowering yourself
  • Vision

Listen in

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Opening Lines at Art Openings: Starting a Conversation

armitage-ruth-day

It’s easy to meet people when you’re at an opening of your own art because you’re the host or hostess. Your job is to meet everyone and to introduce your guests to one another.

Not true when you’re the guest at someone else’s opening. When you don’t have a role to play, it’s uncomfortable to force yourself to meet people.

And, yet, you know it’s important.

Students in my Art Career Success System understand how critical it is to meet more people. New relationships might lead to opportunities, sales, and lifelong fans.

So what do you do? How do you start a conversation with a stranger without getting sick to your stomach?

Alyson to the rescue! Below is a list of conversation starters that you can start practicing immediately.

You don’t even have to be at an opening to begin. Try talking to

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Should My Hometown Deaccession Public Sculpture of Lesser Quality? (Curious Monday)

Brother and Sister at the Rodeo - Sculpture in Golden, Colorado

There’s an art controversy in my sleepy little hometown of Golden, Colorado.

Six bronze sculptures have been recommended for deaccession from the City’s collection. The reasoning:

– They were mass produced in China.

– They are judged to be of lesser quality.

– They are signed by “fake” artists. No one can find an artist by these names.

And, yet, many people love these pieces.

I’m curious about what you think.

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Test Your Social Media Effort

VMFA

As I said in last week’s post: In marketing your art, there are no absolutes. Everything is a test.

That was about testing your email marketing results.

This week I want to look at testing your social media results, and the same principle applies: Everything is a test.

4 For-Sure Facts

I’m absolutely certain about these 4 things when it comes to testing social media:

1. The payoff for investing your effort into social media will be greater if you focus on your foundation (website, blog, email list) first.

Without this foundation in place, social media isn’t as useful. You need to have a place to send people – an online portfolio to show off your art and/or your expertise if you’re a teacher.

2. You can share a post similar to someone else’s and get radically different results.

This is why we read that the best time to post to your Facebook business page is at 11:30 am in one place and 6:30 am in another. You have a unique list of followers and have to see for yourself.

3. Your level of enthusiasm will show in what you post.

The greater your

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Balancing Studio Time with Business Time (Curious Monday)

Tami Bone photograph of woman holding terrarium

Know that you are not alone in wanting to know the answer to this question.

It’s asked of me so often that I thought I’d throw it out to you.

Loyal reader Tami Bone put it this way …

How do other artists juggle or balance studio time with time to focus on marketing and business?

I find the switching back and forth to be difficult, and it seems I need full days to focus on one or the other.

So, what say you?

How do you find the balance? How do you divide your time between business and making art?

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Test Your Email Marketing and Track Your Results

Megan Carty, Cundy's Harbor

In marketing your art, there are no absolutes. Everything is a test.

Is it better to send your newsletter on a Tuesday or on a Friday?

Will you get better engagement from posting to Facebook at 7:00 a.m. or noon?

Are your Instagram followers more likely to engage with you once or twice a day?

In this article I’m going to focus on email testing. Next week we’ll look at social media testing.

You’ll get a host of different answers if you Google “best time to send an email.” Test them! Track them!

In order for you to understand what works best for you, you have to track your results.

I’ve been testing foods lately to see what is right (and wrong) for my body. I track my weight, basal body temperature, sleep, water intake, and more to see what causes inflammation for me.

Yep, it’s a lot of work to track all of this, but the payoff of optimal physical and mental health will be worth it.

Likewise, your email marketing goal is optimal results for your efforts. You’re looking for more sales, sign-ups, registrations, click-throughs, or engagement. You might also be seeking a higher open rate.

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