Book Your Next Exhibition - Now

Book Your Next Exhibition Now

Yeah, I know you’d rather be in the studio.
Yeah, I know it’s super cheap and easy to show your art online.
Yeah, I know it’s a slog to find a good exhibition space.

And, yeah, I know that if you’re physically and geographically able to show your art in public and you’re not doing so, you’re just making excuses. Not only that, you’re also:

  • Missing out on sales and networking opportunities.
  • Taking the easy way out.
  • Working your way to a less-than-stellar art career.

Exhibiting your art in live venues should be one of your primary goals. Book a show now!

Let’s Define “Exhibition”

For our purposes, an exhibition is simply your art on public view. It could be any of the following:

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Website Wars: WordPress vs Squarespace vs Wix vs Weebly

Website Wars: Choosing between WordPress, Wix, Weebly, and Squarespace

Guest blogger: Kim Bruce

After researching, comparing and gathering information on what you need to know to make a choice between WordPress, Squarespace, Wix or Weebly, I have come to the conclusion that there is no conclusion.

Each of these services has something to offer depending on your needs.

For example, if you’re a hobby artist, a free Weebly site, which includes their paid ads, may suffice.

An artist with little or no computer skills may want a simple drag-and-drop interface, which is available with all services (drag-and-drop themes are available for WordPress).

A professional artist may, and probably should, prefer the power that the WordPress platform offers.

In all honesty, I find it very difficult to compare Squarespace, Wix or Weebly with WordPress the self-hosted version (

WordPress is different. It’s a robust, scalable, open source (free) application that can be whatever you need it to be.

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How to Build a Student Following - Online and Off

How to Build a Student Following

If you want to teach, you need a pool of potential students.

You need a following. And a following suggests there is a leader. If you expect people to sign up for your classes or buy your how-to book, you must step up and be the leader.

You’ve got to position yourself as an expert.

Becoming known for your skills is not an overnight process. It’s a process that you must be dedicated to and in it for the long haul.

I built Art Biz Coach using all of the tactics I share below. I think it would be harder to start my business today because the market is much noisier than when I opened back in 2002.

Your market is also robust. There are more people seeking instruction, and there are a lot more artists who are teaching in their own studios, in art centers and supply stores, and online.

In business terms, this presents both a threat and an opportunity. The threat is that more people are competing for students. The opportunity is that you can differentiate yourself.

The distinguishing characteristics of a successful, independent art teacher are:

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Eureka! The Purpose Of Your Newsletter

Eureka! The purpose of your artist newsletter.

A couple of years ago, I wrote an article about why artists should publish newsletters. I’m delighted that people read it and remembered its basic premise: that artist newsletters aren’t for making sales.

However, I’m troubled that some of that article has been misunderstood, or perhaps I left too much room for misinterpretation.

It’s time to set the record straight on artist newsletters.

First, a definition. A newsletter is an email sent on a regular schedule, which probably has regular features. Mine has a personal note at the top, a client testimonial, a featured article, and a featured product.

Every time I sit down to write my newsletter, I know that I have to fill in these areas before it can be sent.

My newsletter is sent weekly. You don’t have to do this. Monthly might work better for you.

But a newsletter has a regular schedule. It’s reliable. It’s a promise you make to yourself and your art. It’s also a promise you made to people when you asked them to sign up for your list.

When you ask people to sign up for your newsletter, they know they’re going to get it when you promise it.

Purpose of a Newsletter

The primary purpose of your newsletter is …

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Reduce the Boring Factor: Add Variety to Your Marketing Message

Art Biz Coach: Vary Your Marketing Message

No more repetitive emails, please.

Your art exhibition, class, workshop, or event has so many facets that there is no reason to send the same emails and social media posts for your promotions. They get a little stale after awhile.

Years ago, Marcia Yudkin wrote a guest post for me on this topic. It was an article she originally wrote for her readers that got me interested.

I still think about that article and keep that list as a reference. It’s time to revisit its premise for you, my artist readers.

Here are plenty of ways to promote your exhibition, event, or teaching.

Many of these suggestions lend themselves to emails. Others could easily be used on social media. Use your noggin to decide.

Exhibition or Event Enticements

Rotate images of your art with short 2- or 3-sentence stories for each.

Do this for two reasons: 1) people are more likely to get excited about a show when they know what they’ll see and

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Art Exhibition Checklist and Timeline to Customize

Exhibition Checklist

A checklist can keep you on task for your exhibition.

The tasks on your checklist, and the deadlines you give them, will depend on the following:

– The type of exhibition (juried, self-curated, open studio)
– If the venue is in charge of sales and refreshments or if that’s up to you
– Whether you’re showing with other artists
– How much time you have to plan

Do It Now

Set a goal. What would you like to have happen at this exhibition or as a result of it?

Plan your budget. How much can you afford to spend on materials and framing? How much can you allocate to promotions, printing, and a reception?

Identify a theme and

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How To Attract More Followers to Your List

How to Attract More Followers

At last week’s Social Sharing Savvy training sessions, I received numerous questions along these lines:

“How can I get more subscribers/followers/fans?”

Watch the language you use and the energy around it. In particular, I’m worried about using the g-word: get.

“Get” could mean anything. It could mean that you buy a list or sleazily grab email addresses from people who didn’t ask to hear from you.

To my ears, getting sounds greedy and aggressive. With get, the emphasis seems to be on quantity rather than quality.

It sounds like you’re only interested in the marketing numbers when you should be far more interested in connecting with people who, in turn, want to connect with your art. You don’t just want numbers. You want the right individuals to add up to those numbers.

Stop looking for shortcuts. Start doing the hard (and much more interesting) work of caring about people and connecting with them authentically.

Instead of getting, focus on attracting.

3 Steps to Attracting People to Your List of Followers

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Content Crimes: How You’re Misbehaving Online


As I wrote last week, you could waste a lot of time online if you’re not paying attention.

Let’s look at this subject a little closer so that we’re not just looking at where you’re wasting time, but at how you’re harming your art career goals.

My friend, Cynthia, calls them content crimes. Nobody is going to throw you in jail for committing these transgressions, but you might check yourself into rehab when you decide to do something about it.

Here are the top 4 content crimes you might be committing.

Content Crime #1: You’re inconsistent.

You sent a newsletter for a few months and then nothing. Nada. The big zippo.

You tried blogging for a while … um … whenever you felt like it.

You heard that artists were selling art from Facebook, so you built a business page and put a few pictures up. It’s just not working for me, you claimed. Waste of time.

If you are truly excited about your art, you’ll share it repeatedly, even if you think nobody is listening, because you believe in yourself. You don’t give up.

If you do give up, I’m led to believe …

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Stop Wasting Time on Social Media


Are you wasting time on social media sites?

I’m not implying that you shouldn’t be on those sites. I’m just wondering if you’re using them to their potential.

It’s not that you need to be posting and sharing more. It’s that you should make sure your ROI (return on investment) is worth it for you. In other words, you should invest in quality, not quantity.

If you don’t, you might be wasting time.

Mindful sharing will bring you more friends, more shares, and more likes, which results in more people to buy your art or to offer you opportunities.

Here are some tips to help ensure that you’re spending time wisely online.

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34 Marketing Insights from the Authority Rainmaker Conference

Marketing Insights from the Authority Rainmaker Conference

It’s a Memorial Day tradition at Art Biz Coach to offer a list of reminders for your art business.

This is a twist on that tradition.

With inspiration from the stage of Copyblogger’s Authority Rainmaker conference, I opened up my notes and share my biggest takeaways with you.

The thing to remember about live events, books, and even online classes is that not everything shared is going to apply to you. You’re either not ready to receive it, you’re past its relevance in your growth, or it doesn’t match your business model.

You have to look for the nuggets in these situations. I find that there is usually at least one thing from each talk, lesson, or chapter that is worth the investment.

Here are some of the highlights worth remembering.

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