Pins and Needles: Proof that Words Can Help You Be Found Online

Guest blogger Kim Bruce shares the story of how she was included in an exhibition proposal by someone who found her through a Google search.

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Beginning a Slide Presentation of Your Art

If you talk about your art to groups, I suggest adding a silent run-through of your images the next time you open a talk.

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A Thesaurus for Your Art

Keep a library of words in a database or notebook. What words can you count on? What words do you need to have at the ready for your next brochure, artist statement, or wall label?

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16 Ideas for Repurposing Your Artist Statement

Jill Saur, Autumn Promise. Acrylic on canvas.

Don’t write your artist statement for someone else. Do it for yourself.

Don’t write your artist statement because you have to. Do it because you will grow and learn.

Don’t write your artist statement and then forget about it. Do it so that you fully embrace the words.

Jill Saur, Autumn Promise. Acrylic on canvas, 36 x 48 inches. ©The Artist

Your self-promotion efforts get much easier once you have the right words to define your art. Here are six ways you can use a good artist statement.

1. Print your statement off in a large font, and turn it into a label for your exhibition.

2. Use it as the basis for text in a grant application.

3. Separate each sentence and expand on it in a blog post.

4. Print your statement on a brochure or in

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Marketing Isn’t About You

Elaine Kehew, Misty Blue Mangold. Oil on linen

Making art is all about you and what you have to say to the world. Marketing your art isn’t about you. Marketing is about your audience and potential audience.

When you’re actively engaged in promoting your art, the tools you use are less important than the end result. You’re aiming to connect with others.

Elaine Kehew, Misty Blue Mangold. Oil on linen, 36 x 30 inches. ©The Artist

It’s hard to connect if your marketing is I-centric — when it’s all about “I did this” or “I did that.”

Look over the last blog post or newsletter you shared. How much of it is for your reader, and how much of it ignores the reader?

Whether you’re sending an email or postcard, writing a newsletter, or posting to your blog, always consider the person at the receiving end.

Whom

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Art Marketing Action Podcast: Marketing Isn’t About You

Audio version of the post with the same name. Making art is all about you, and marketing your art is about your audience and ideal fans. You’re aiming to connect with others, so make sure your marketing is not I-centric.

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Don’t let your text become outdated

Your About page and all other pages and posts on your blog or website should include text that is as “evergreen” as possible. “Evergreen” means that it will be just as valid next year as it is right now. Here’s an example.

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LIVE HUMAN BEINGS

The purpose of your subject line is to get people to open your email message. If you’re stuck on the same old, lame old subject lines, try to be a little more creative. It’s possible to be interesting without falling back on cute.

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Brag Better About Your Art, About You

Peggy Klaus, author of Brag! How to Toot Your Own Horn Without Blowing It, says brag is not a four-letter word: “Remaining quiet about your successes only leads to being underappreciated and overlooked.” Brag better about your art by spending time reviewing your accomplishments.

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Art Marketing Action Podcast: Brag Better About Your Art, About You

Audio version of the post with the same name. Peggy Klaus, author of Brag! How to Toot Your Own Horn Without Blowing It, says brag is not a four-letter word: “Remaining quiet about your successes only leads to being underappreciated and overlooked.” Brag better about your art by spending time reviewing your accomplishments.

Continue reading…