Book Your Next Exhibition - Now

Book Your Next Exhibition Now

Yeah, I know you’d rather be in the studio.
Yeah, I know it’s super cheap and easy to show your art online.
Yeah, I know it’s a slog to find a good exhibition space.

And, yeah, I know that if you’re physically and geographically able to show your art in public and you’re not doing so, you’re just making excuses. Not only that, you’re also:

  • Missing out on sales and networking opportunities.
  • Taking the easy way out.
  • Working your way to a less-than-stellar art career.

Exhibiting your art in live venues should be one of your primary goals. Book a show now!

Let’s Define “Exhibition”

For our purposes, an exhibition is simply your art on public view. It could be any of the following:

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Curate a Solo Show of Your Art

Dora Ficher’s solo show “El Balle de Colores” at Gold Standard Café in Philadelphia, PA.

Are you still diddling around with juried shows or exhibitions with your art group?

There’s nothing wrong with either one of these as a starting point, but there comes a time when you have to leave the nest. You have to plan a solo exhibition.

Your career will grow rapidly when you start having solo exhibitions of your art.

Dora Ficher’s solo show “El Balle de Colores” at Gold Standard Café in Philadelphia, PA.

Solo shows are the pinnacle of an artist’s career, but in most artists’ dreams they usually take place at fine galleries and museums.

Those prestigious venues will happen for those who persevere. In the beginning, you will probably need to curate your solo show for less lofty places.

All possibilities are on the table: restaurants, private homes, rented storefronts, bank lobbies, salons, or your

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Is Your Art Just Free Décor?

Judith Glover painting

There are all kinds of places where you could show your work.

Coffee shops would love to have your art! Salons would fawn over it! Professional offices would think they’d died and gone to heaven!

This is great news for you, especially when you are just starting out. It’s a stamp of approval when public spaces want to show your work.

©2014 Ginny Herzog, Relic 12-514. Oil, cold wax, and collage, 30 by 40 inches. Used with permission.

Almost every artist does the “free” circuit. It’s where you get your toes wet.

These seemingly low-risk venues offer a place for you to learn how to install your art correctly, while introducing your art to new people.

You’ll test your conversational skills, your pricing, and your negotiating skills.

Because these non-art venues are considered “less serious” than galleries, many artists

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Yep, It’s Art and It’s for Sale

yep-for-sale

Imagine the scenario: A patron visits your open studio event, walks around for a few minutes, and asks, “Are these for sale?” Or this version: A friend shares an image of your art that you posted on Facebook. Hundreds of people see it and a handful wish they could own it. But they think they can’t afford it because there’s no price. So they forget about it and move on.

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Vanity Galleries vs. Co-ops

Janice McDonald Collages

I was talking with an artist-friend the other day and this came up . . . Deep Thought: What’s the difference between a vanity gallery and a co-op? Why are co-ops (where artists pay to be members) considered okay, whereas vanity galleries (where artists pay to exhibit) are off-limits?

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Remix Images of Your Art for a Fresh Look

Karen Meredith Portfolio Page

We started talking about what it means to curate art and then looked at guidelines for you to do the job yourself. Today I want to give you some ideas to help freshen up your art – not just for others, but for you. You will learn things about your art when you challenge yourself to look at it in new ways. Because we’re meeting in a virtual space, we’ll look at how this might be done on a website, but everything I share here could be applied to a live venue.

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Adopt the Museum Curator Approach

In a post last week, I discussed the value of curating your art and approaching it as an additive rather than subtractive process. I wrote: The first step in curating your art is to start with a piece or two that best represent what you’re trying to communicate. After you’ve done this, you can build your exhibition or Web page around that piece. If you find you have too many in the end, you can start subtracting.

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The First Step to Curating Your Art

empty gallery

Let’s face it. Artists are terrible at curating their own work. There’s no way you can be objective. You love everything, you hate everything, you want to show everything you have, or you don’t want to show anything at all. Sound familiar? Today’s article is inspired by an email I received from Karen Meredith, in which she wanted to know about the proper number of works to have on a website, in an exhibition, or at an open studio.

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16 Ways to Demonstrate Your Art Has Value

Sarah Snavely demonstrates how she packs her sculpture – securely and professionally. Image used with permission.

Sometimes we get sloppy and forget that everything we do and say around our work affects how others perceive it. You teach people how to treat you and your art. Make sure you’re sending the right signals. Here are 16 things to consider.

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Wine & Cheese AGAIN???

Deep Thought

The awesome and amazing Matt LeBlanc was generous enough to talk with me this week about his Fusion art and entertainment event, which he deliberately created to be different from the same old wine-and-cheese openings. More than an opening, Fusion is an annual sold-out EVENT.

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