3 Artist Stories To Inspire You

Brad Reyes Art

I haven’t been telling you about all of the amazing thing my members, students, and followers are doing and I’m going to try to do a better job of this. Starting now.

I hope these three stories inspire you.

1. Holly Wilson

Holly Wilson presents her audacious idea at Art Biz Makeover in October of 2013.

Holly Wilson, a member of the Art Biz Incubator, was nervous and shaking as she presented an audacious product idea at my Art Biz Makeover event last fall. After receiving lots of laughter and positive feedback, Holly immediately put her plan into action. The concept is in response to the sexism she has faced from gallerists.

The result of Holly’s action was a successful Kickstarter campaign, which got picked up by Continue Reading…

How Sponsors Helped Me Exhibit My Art on the Other Side of the Country – without Kickstarter

Elizabeth St. Hilaire Nelson

Crowdfunding is helping artists everywhere get their projects off the ground. It’s increasingly popular to use sites like Kickstarter and Indiegogo to raise money for exhibitions and art production. Guest blogger Elizabeth St. Hilaire Nelson shares how she crowdfunded her participation in ArtPrize – without the use of a crowdfunding site.

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Tax-deductible Crowdsourced Funding through Artspire

Launched last fall by the New York Foundation for the Arts (NYFA), Artspire.org is a new community website that empowers individual artists and organizations anywhere in the country to support their work with tax-deductible contributions while building entrepreneurship and creating a robust social network of supporters.

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Ask for sponsorship

There may come a time when you need to ask someone for a donation or in-kind gift.

Let’s say you’d like someone to sponsor an art opening for your organization. [ Side note: It’s easier to get sponsorship for larger, nonprofit organizations than for individual artists because (1) it’s a tax deduction for the donor and (2) more people show up at the events. ]

Erin Casey, Grace After a Windstorm. Porcelain. ©The Artist

Your first step is to get clear about what–EXACTLY–you want and need. You won’t get far with a vague request such as “We’ll take whatever you can give.” That’s not helpful to anyone. You must be specific that you need X amount, whether it’s cash or in-kind. An in-kind donation is a gift of goods or services (e.g. printing, advertising, food, beverages, live music) in place of cash. You might not get X, but you need to

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