4 Moves To Ignite The Passion For Your Art Business

©Frances Vettergreen, One Hundred. Oil and wax on panel, 36 x 36 inches. Used with permission

Is that the sound of July 4th fireworks I hear? Or is your art business on fire? I would love to hear that it’s your business – that you are Hot – Hot – Hot for what you have to share with the world. If you’re only hearing fireworks outside your walls and not inside your head and heart, there are four things you should do – and keep doing – to ignite the passion for your art business.

Beware of Poisonous Relationships

poison

The second principle of no-excuse self-promotion, according to I’d Rather Be in the Studio is: “Connections are critical to your success. To succeed, you must make an effort to meet new people and to maintain relationships.” But not all connections are equal. Some connections can be detrimental to your art, your emotional well-being, and your growth.

Rejection Rituals

Girl covering her eyes with her hands

One of my Art Biz Bootcampers recently asked a question of our group that I think deserves a bigger stage. Deep Thought: Do you have any rituals around rejections? Maybe something involving screaming, hiding, crying, or throwing things?

Empowering Art Viewers

That’s me looking at Mel Ristau’s sculpture inside a locked building.

One of the most valuable things you can do in your marketing is to teach people how to look at and appreciate your art. It’s not just good for you, but a gift that will last throughout the lives of those who experience it. I learned long ago when I worked in a museum that teaching people how to look at art empowers them and gives them confidence. Teaching people how to look at art empowers them and gives them confidence. Empowering them with skills is invaluable – to both you and them.

Share the Stage to Make Fast Fans

spotlight on stage

Doesn’t it feel good when other people say nice things about you and your art? It’s easy to pass along this sensation to those you care about. Sharing the stage and shining the spotlight on other people will turn them into fast fans while taking some of the weight off of you to promote your work all of the time. It will also make you feel good!

Why I Never Advise You To Follow Your Passion

If “Follow Your Passion” works for you, heed the call! I’m not going to tell you not to follow your passion. You just won’t hear me offering those words as quick-and-easy business advice, which is often how they appear in print. Here’s my alternative version, which I hope serves you.

Fight Complacency

When is the last time you promoted your art without relying solely on email and social media? Apply a similar mindset to your marketing that you use in the studio when you’re trying to work through a problem. Try something new. Anything!

Never Forget: Reminders for Your Art Business

It’s easy to get caught up in the latest this or that and lose focus. Slow down and remind yourself of these building blocks for your art career. It’s the annual Memorial Day post.

Fail-Proof Business Advice from 10 Years of Art Biz Coach

©Ruth Dent, Needles. Lithograph and linocut. 30.5 x 30.5 centimeters.

Last week, in celebration of my 10-year anniversary at Art Biz Coach, I gave my top 10 pieces of marketing advice from the decade of this newsletter.

Today, let’s look at some sound business advice that it pays to review from time to time – another top 10.

©Ruth Dent, Needles. Lithograph and linocut. 30.5 x 30.5 centimeters. Ruth is a member of the Artist Conspiracy. Used with permission.

10. Proceed with caution when donating your art.

Most artists can’t afford to run a charitable business at a loss. Artists in the U.S. can’t even write off the full-market value of donated art, which is a fact that most non-art organizations aren’t aware of. Donating too frequently (1) lessens the value of your art; (2) weakens the art market in your area; and (3) encourages people to wait to

3 Things Artists Can Do to Connect with More Art Buyers

Whitney Ferré

Every piece of original art has tremendous energy. It vibrates with the colors and intentions you created. Share this with your audience and you are not only creating an object they can see, but one they can experience.