Fail-Proof Business Advice from 10 Years of Art Biz Coach

©Ruth Dent, Needles. Lithograph and linocut. 30.5 x 30.5 centimeters.

Last week, in celebration of my 10-year anniversary at Art Biz Coach, I gave my top 10 pieces of marketing advice from the decade of this newsletter.

Today, let’s look at some sound business advice that it pays to review from time to time – another top 10.

©Ruth Dent, Needles. Lithograph and linocut. 30.5 x 30.5 centimeters. Ruth is a member of the Artist Conspiracy. Used with permission.

10. Proceed with caution when donating your art.

Most artists can’t afford to run a charitable business at a loss. Artists in the U.S. can’t even write off the full-market value of donated art, which is a fact that most non-art organizations aren’t aware of. Donating too frequently (1) lessens the value of your art; (2) weakens the art market in your area; and (3) encourages people to wait to

3 Things Artists Can Do to Connect with More Art Buyers

Whitney Ferré

Every piece of original art has tremendous energy. It vibrates with the colors and intentions you created. Share this with your audience and you are not only creating an object they can see, but one they can experience.

There Aren’t Enough Read Hours

Ken Munsie Sculpture

I gave away a copy of my book to an artist unknown in the faraway land of Australia. Something very cool happened as a result. Read about it.

Just Because . . .

gift

Say thanks just because your heart is full. Be nice just because it’s Monday. Expect nothing in return. Do it just because.

6 Be’s of the Art Biz

Mara Purl

Guest blogger Mara Purl is an actress-turned-writer-performer-producer. The central character in her soon-to-be-released book is a fine artist. In this post, Mara shares what she calls the Be’s of the Art Biz: Be Authentic, Be Brave, Be Persistent, Be in Integrity, Be in Experience, and Be Creative.

Reminders for Your Art Biz

Emily Clarke, Showing a Little Leg

©2009 Emily Clarke, Showing a Little Leg. Oil on masonite, 24 x 36 inches.

It’s easy to get caught up in the tsunami of advice, marketing tools, and social media messages. Take time to remember what is most important.

It’s the annual Memorial Day post – a few days in advance. Slow down and make sure you’re on track with these reminders.

Remember that you can’t do it all. You can only take one step at a time. Don’t punish yourself for something you should have done a long time ago. Just look forward and know you’re doing the best you can.

Remember to be consistent. Your success will be the result of the habits and routines you put in place for your studio and marketing time. This is our focus in the Blast Off class launching 1 week

7 Ways to Establish That Your Art Has Value

Alyson Champ, Omelette. Oil on linen.

Whether or not you have a sales track record for your art, you can still take actions to show people that your art has value. Here are seven ways.

Alyson Champ, Omelette. Oil on linen, 20 x 24 inches. ©The Artist

1. Make great art.

I mean really great art. The kind of art that makes the heavens sing. Don’t settle for mediocre or “good enough” where your work is concerned. It’s time to stand out!

2. Treat your art with care.

One of the first newsletters I wrote back in 2002 begged you to treat your art like it belongs in a museum. I repeat this mantra often. This means keeping a detailed inventory, using high-quality materials, handling (and shipping) your art with great care, and talking about it with respect. This brings me to . .

Artists’ Ideas <- Deep Thought Thursday

Today’s Deep Thought should get your juices flowing. All I’m asking is . . . Is there such a thing as an original idea in art anymore? Has everything been done before? Have all the good ideas been taken?

Make your art big enough to hold your ideas and dreams

Don’t let size or space be an issue when you make your art. Make your art it as big as it needs to be in order to hold your ideas and dreams. If it’s good enough, it will find a home. If you have to borrow a truck to haul it, you’ll do that, too.

Deep Thought Thursday: 1 piece of art

Me with de Kooning's Woman IV at the Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art

Here’s a little game you can play at the next exhibit you visit. What do you want to take home with you? Why? Play the game by thinking back to the last art exhibit you visited.