17 Surprising Ways to Lure People to Your Website

©Julie Gowing Hayes, Party Barge. Oil on linen panel, 20 x 30 inches. Used with permission.

The darnedest thing about having a website: just because you build it doesn’t mean people will come.

Creating a website is just the first step. Now you have to get people to visit it, and driving traffic to your site is an ongoing task. It should always be top of mind.

©John-Michael Korpal, Twig Balloons. Mixed media, 6 x 8 feet. Used with permission.

See if you could add some of these ideas to your marketing mix and get more eyes on your art.

Best, Basic Practices

1. Write a newsletter article with a hook, which requires recipients to visit your site to read the end of the article.

2. Tell people why they should click. What’s in it for them?

3. Give something away to people who visit your site and sign up for your list.

3. Mention your website address

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5 Steps to Take Charge of Your Art Marketing (and Why You Must)

©2014 Claire Browne, Stem. Mixed media, 7 x 3 feet. Used with permission.

Stop waiting for the famous gallery dealer to call you up. Stop waiting for the artist agent-fairy to wave her wand. Stop waiting to win the lottery.

©2014 Claire Browne, Stem. Mixed media, 7 x 3 feet. Used with permission.

Start taking charge.

You have to plan for business growth. It doesn’t happen on its own. Nobody cares about your success more than you do, and nobody can do a better job marketing your art than you can.

Here are five steps for taking charge of your art marketing, which will send you well on your way to getting what you want from your art career.

1. Write down what you want.

Many people don’t get the life they really want because they haven’t taken the time to define it. They haven’t asked for it!

It’s a bold move to commit to an idea,

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3 Thought-Provoking Questions for a Better Artist Statement

Vickie Martin collage

A strong artist statement is essential to the effective marketing of your art.

There’s no skating by on this one. You need at least one artist statement for each body of work you create.

Writing your statement is a process. Like any other type of writing or artmaking, you can’t expect to nail it in a single sitting. And, like all good things that take time, it will be time well spent. The process helps you gain clarity about your art.

©Terri Schmitt, Lemons and Ball Jar. 16 x 20 inches.

If you can’t define your art in a statement, you will likely face difficulty marketing your work. Where else will you get language for wall labels, brochure and website text, informal presentations, and conversations?

Answering these three questions will help you write a better

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Yep, It’s Art and It’s for Sale

yep-for-sale

Imagine the scenario: A patron visits your open studio event, walks around for a few minutes, and asks, “Are these for sale?” Or this version: A friend shares an image of your art that you posted on Facebook. Hundreds of people see it and a handful wish they could own it. But they think they can’t afford it because there’s no price. So they forget about it and move on.

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Multiple Websites for Multiple Businesses

Rebecca Finch art

Rebecca Finch asks: “I work primarily in fine art paintings, but I also do graphic design and portrait photography. Do I have to create different websites for each?” In I’d Rather Be in the Studio I write: 3 different styles of art = 3 different audiences = 3 times the marketing effort. I’m sure this probably isn’t what you want to hear, Rebecca, but this is you. You have 3 different businesses and, therefore, 3 different audiences.

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Why You Might Need Additional Domain Names for Your Art

Carol A. McIntyre, one of my Gold Mastermind members, has her site at carolamcintyre.com and pointing from paintingharmony.com. She also owns 16 other URLs for her art, teaching, and books.

Yay! You have a URL and website. Boo! You only have one. But . . . Yay! You’re a savvy businessperson and willing to listen to why you should care about buying more URLs. Here are four reasons you want additional domain names (URLs).

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2 Guidelines for Requesting a Donation

please give

You’re probably accustomed to people asking you to donate your art to this or that cause, but have you ever been on the other side? Have you ever been the one making the request for a donation? There will come a time in your art career when you must ask for donations. Not just money, but also gifts of services or products.

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Roll Out the Red Carpet for Your VIPs

Red security rope by red carpet.

Your friends and followers on social media are valuable, but the people who buy from you and entrust you with their email and physical addresses are your VIPs. How do you roll out the red carpet for VIPs who offer their support and trust? Here are some ideas.

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6 Ninja Tips for Getting Noticed

billboard-here i am

If you’re feeling a little like a wallflower or left out of the art conversation, here are six tips – short of renting billboard space – to get you back on the radar of the VIPs in the art world. Most of these actions work well with arts administrators, arts writers, gallery directors, or curators. Any one of them would be a step in the right direction.

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DIY Not DIA Marketing

Kerry Thompson (a.k.a. Kerry Millard) talks about illustrating a book.

Art Biz Coach was launched 11 years ago after I heard from many artists that they wanted an agent. They were looking for someone to do the work for them so that they could stay in the studio and work. I opted to teach artists how to best represent themselves and take control of their careers (Do It Yourself or DIY) without doing it alone (DIA).

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