Networking Opportunities and Errors

networking-opportunitites

Meeting new people is essential to growing your art business.

The more people you know, the more people there are to appreciate, buy, and tell people about your art.

The best tip I can give is just to get out! Online relationships are valuable, but in-person meetings can make an artist’s career.

Everyone you run into is a:

  • Potential buyer. You never know where people are coming from.
  • Potential connector. If everyone you meet knows 150 people (the average), imagine the possibilities. When you meet someone who is great at making connections between people, WOW!
  • Potential friend or fan. Who can’t use more of these?

Become involved with an artist organization if it’s the right speed for you. If you are serious about selling your art, don’t waste your time in a group of hobbyists. You’ll quickly get frustrated in groups where you’re always a step ahead of everyone else.

Continue reading…

Tips for Working with an Accountability Partner in Your Art Marketing

Amantha Tsaros Art

Most artists work alone and flourish in their silence without interruptions. This is critical for the creative process. But when it comes to building a business, know this: You will make better progress in art marketing and business planning by joining up with an equally ambitious accountability partner.

Continue reading…

Creative Immersion and Value of Connection

Photo of Artists at a Business Workshop

I interviewed Anne Paris, author of Standing at Water’s Edge: Moving Past Fear, Blocks, and Pitfalls to Discover the Power of Creative Immersion, for my membership program a couple of years ago. To give you a taste of what my members receive, I would like to share this interview with you. Anne and I discussed creative immersion and the importance of connecting through relationships to facilitate creativity.

Continue reading…

Group Energy You Can't Duplicate Online

At dinner with artists Rae Marie, Angeline-Marie Martinez, Shari Sherman, me, Denisse Berlinghieri, Robin Pedrero, and Victoria Page Miller.

Online connections have their place in marketing your art, but most in-person experiences can’t be duplicated in the same way on a computer. I’ll go one step further: certain in-person opportunities would never arise if you relied only on the Internet. Last week I was reminded of this during a 3-day Florida workshop in which I participated.

Continue reading…

6 Ninja Tips for Getting Noticed

billboard-here i am

If you’re feeling a little like a wallflower or left out of the art conversation, here are six tips – short of renting billboard space – to get you back on the radar of the VIPs in the art world. Most of these actions work well with arts administrators, arts writers, gallery directors, or curators. Any one of them would be a step in the right direction.

Continue reading…

13 Truths About Marketing Your Art

1. No one can promote your art more effectively than you. No one knows it better than you and no one cares about your success more than you. 2. If you don’t believe it can happen, it won’t.

Continue reading…

How Evernote Can Save Your Relationships with Collectors

Database/spreadsheet programs for artists can be complex and clunky. Guest blogger Laurie McCarriar outlines 5 ways to use Evernote, a free app for Mac, PC & mobile devices, to cultivate collectors.

Continue reading…

3 Ways to Be a Rock Star in Your Art Community

Be seen at openings, lectures, and events, and show your work – a lot! Be supportive of arts organizations and of other artists. Be a reporter.

Continue reading…

5 Face-to-Face Networking Essentials

A sampling of business cards I came home with - most with notes on the backs.

The value of face-to-face marketing is being drowned out by the cacophony of online marketing advice. Here are 5 face-to-face networking essentials to remember when attending events, openings, and conferences.

Continue reading…

Secrets for Becoming More Approachable: Audio Interview

Scott Ginsberg

Artists must nurture excellent communication skills, be approachable, and learn how to handle the opportunities that arise for obtaining gallery representation and selling to buyers. I called on Scott Ginsberg of “Hello My Name is Scott” fame to talk with me about how we can do a better job of this.

Continue reading…