5 Steps to a Magazine Feature of You and Your Art

photo of Patricia Griffin

The November 2014 / January 2015 edition of Professional Artist magazine features an article by me titled “Think Before You Leap: Beware of People Who Tell You to Follow Your Passion.”

The editor suggested photos of artists at work to accompany the article and I knew exactly who to contact: ceramic artist Patricia Griffin.

Patricia Griffin in her studio. Photo by Debbie Markham.

Patricia is a member of my Art Biz Incubator and I receive her newsletter.

Months ago she sent an email with gorgeous photos of her in the studio. I complimented her on the images and she told me that she had hired a professional photographer to take photos of her in the studio. It showed.

Patricia’s photos were so engaging that they stood out among the hundreds of emails I see from artists. I remembered them

31 Types of Photographs You Can Use to Promote Your Art

Adele Sypesteyn paintings in a room

Don’t underestimate your audience’s desire to know more about you and more about your life as an artist. And never underestimate the story that a good photograph can tell. Share photos of Your Art, Your Office, Your Studio, and You. I’ll bet you already have a lot of these photos, but are you showing them? Could you share a quick link to them if you were asked?

Share the Stage to Make Fast Fans

spotlight on stage

Doesn’t it feel good when other people say nice things about you and your art? It’s easy to pass along this sensation to those you care about. Sharing the stage and shining the spotlight on other people will turn them into fast fans while taking some of the weight off of you to promote your work all of the time. It will also make you feel good!

Give - and Claim - Credit

Leslie Parke, Tracks

Me, Meaghan Flaherty, and Libby Hintz. Photo by Pat D’Aversa.

I flubbed up last week big time.

I failed to give credit to the photographer of the personal picture in the Art Marketing Action newsletter.

The photographer who made Megan Flaherty, Libby Hintz, and me look so good was Pat D’Aversa.

I know better than this – especially since I had just taught about the importance of credit lines in the Long Island workshop that Pat attended!

Photo by Kimberly Lennox

I’d like to say this was an isolated incident, but I also erred with the book jacket for my 2011 edition of I’d Rather Be in the Studio. I used a new photo, but I didn’t catch that the cover designer hadn’t changed the name of the photographer. (I was the only proofreader who would have known

Don’t Miss the Kodak Moments of Your Art Career

It’s awful to wake up the day after an opening, workshop, or art show and think of all the photos you wish you had taken. Make a plan to shoot the photos you’ll wish you had later.

Correct Your Reference Photos

Most compact digital cameras have significant barrel distortion. The wider the lens, the worse the effect. So when you take a picture of someone, their nose looks bigger than it should. Guest blogger Jeremy Lee shows you how to correct for this in your reference photographs.