A Creative Idea for Unloading Earlier Art

gavel

There’s too much art hiding in studios, basements, and garages.

If you have a problem with overflowing inventory, especially a lot of earlier art that you aren’t excited about showing, how about finding new homes for that work? At the same time, you’ll create room for new art, support a good cause, and earn income.

Organize a Fundraiser

Yep, I’m talking about a fundraiser.

Now before you cut me off because you think I’m going to tell you to donate your art, hang tight. Just the opposite is true because you’re going to make money on this fundraiser.

There must be a cause that is close to your heart: animals, the environment, education, an art center. Pick one and ask a nonprofit organization to partner with you.

This partnership is key because the organization should have a solid list

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I Love Your Art But It's Not For Me

I love your art, but it's not for me | Art Biz Coach

You know the type.

She attends your show and tells you what a wonderful artist you are. This makes you feel good. You’re happy for people to connect with your work this way.

She comes to the next opening and gushes in a way that makes you blush.

She raves repeatedly about your art. I love your work! she says.

Yet, she never buys. She’s implying, I love your art, but it’s not for me.

What gives?

Exercise Your Courage Muscle

Who knows why people don’t buy. Maybe they don’t dig that yellow speck in the lower left. Or maybe they just emptied their bank account to pay for a root canal.

If not closing the sale is bothering you, maybe it’s time to exercise your courage muscle and ask the repeat fan why she’s not pulling out her

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Trust (and Verify) Artist Opportunities

Janice McDonald, Helen Hiebert, and Alyson. Helen had a fantastic working experience with a Denver-area library that purchased her piece (above) titled The Wish.

There are all kinds of opportunities for artists to show and to sell their work.

Your inbox probably has an email from a rich oil sheik in Qatar who wants to buy your art right now.

What do you do? How can you tell the good opportunities from those you should avoid?

My advice is always to trust first and to be cautious second and most importantly.

Janice McDonald, Helen Hiebert, and Alyson. Helen had a fantastic working experience with a Denver-area library that purchased her piece (above) titled The Wish.

As with everything in your art business, the onus is on you to verify all of the facts. Here’s how you do that.

Visit When You Can

Peruse online gallery sites for signs of business legitimacy and also to see the range of art they’re showing.

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Earlier Work Hasn't Sold: What to Do?

Deep Thought

You are up to your eyeballs in unsold work!

What you’d really like to do is just get rid of it. It’s taking up your energy and you can’t afford to rent storage just for early work.

Deep Thought: What do you do with early work that hasn’t sold and no one seems to want?

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Structure a Sale to Unload an Oversized Inventory

Big Sale

How do you get rid of an inventory of reproductions, note cards, calendars, or anything else you no longer want to promote and sell? Have a sale! Here are some parameters for structuring your sale. Count your inventory.

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When To Give Up On Your Art Business

White Flag

You have to have thick skin and and iron stomach to endure the rejection and hard work that come with being an artist. Most artists weren’t born with this gene, but many of you have adapted. If you are missing the gene or haven’t been able to adapt to running an art business, there is no reason to feel like a failure.

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When Marketing Your Art Feels Unnatural

If you are struggling with the thought of marketing your art, stop thinking about selling so much – share, don’t sell! Sharing is authentic and comes from your heart. You don’t have to be a salesperson or do anything that isn’t natural. All you have to be is confident in your work and enthusiastic about sharing it with others.

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What Papa Taught Me About Selling Art from the Trunk of His Car

Charles Pannage Sculpture

Papa didn’t care for any art other than his own and didn’t know the “rules” of the art world. Heck, he didn’t even know there was an art world! Getting into a gallery never entered his thoughts. He just drove around with a trunk full of sculptures to show to people.

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Ripping Through the Veils of Illusion Around Online Art Marketplaces

To plunge into the Web’s round-the-clock marketplace is both daunting and compelling. It’s delicious to imagine prodigious sales allowing you to “Quit Your Day Job” so you can ship hoards of orders in your Dr. Denton’s and then glide into your studio to make more.

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Is Your Art a Product?

Product is a slippery word for many artists to embrace. Deep Thought Thursday: Is art a product? Is your art a product? If not, how is it different from a product?

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