Aligning Actions with Words = Success

Do your actions align with your words?

What I mean is: if you say that you want a successful art career, are you doing what it takes? Or are you exerting the minimum effort without any thought of your future?

If you say you want one thing, but aren’t taking action to support that one thing, you are out of alignment. You’re confusing the Universe – probably because you have mixed feelings yourself.

©Judy Knott, Jerome Barstools. Oil on canvas, 16 x 20 inches. Used with permission.

©Judy Knott, Jerome Barstools. Oil on canvas, 16 x 20 inches. Used with permission.

If you proclaim that you want a successful art career, I have six questions to to ensure that your actions align with your dreams.

1. Do you maintain a regular studio practice?

I don’t mean to imply that you have to be in the studio from 8:00am to 5:00pm every day for six days a week. I’m just asking if the art is getting made.

Without the art, you are not an artist. Without the art, you have nothing to promote.

Without the art, a successful art career just ain’t happenin’.

2. Are you promoting your art consistently?

Or are you promoting your art only when you feel like it?

Consistent promotion doesn’t equal bombarding your list and followers with your art. It’s about having a schedule and sticking to it rather than marketing whenever it strikes your fancy.

If you’re a dabbler, you have the luxury of marketing whenever you want to.

If you want a successful art career, you have to get over the idea that marketing is optional.

3. Are you networking?

A successful art career implies you also want a successful business and successful businesses don’t wait for people to come find them. They pound the pavement and the virtual space.

©Terry Parker, Sunburst Tumblers. Stoneware. Used with permission.

©Terry Parker, Sunburst Tumblers. Stoneware. Used with permission.

Are you getting out of your studio and meeting new people? Or are you waiting for them to find you?

4. Are you writing and speaking about your art?

Or are you hoping that the work will speak for itself?

As a former museum educator, I am well equipped to dispense this wake-up call: Your art never speaks for itself – especially to novice buyers and collectors.

Part of the job of successful artists is to write and speak articulately about the work.

This helps to educate new art buyers without being condescending. And curators and gallerists at the highest levels of the art world expect it of you.

5. Are you planning sufficiently?

If you say you’d like to earn more money as an artist, are you creating a plan to increase your income? Or are you just hoping it will happen?

Nothing tells the Universe, Hey! I’m ready!, like making a plan. Without the plan, the powers that be don’t take you seriously.

Put your pen to paper and chart your course.

©Felice Panagrosso, Cora’s Coffee Shoppe. Oil on canvas, 50 x 50 centimeters. Used with permission.

©Felice Panagrosso, Cora’s Coffee Shoppe. Oil on canvas, 50 x 50 centimeters. Used with permission.

6. Are you implementing the plan?

All of the planning in the world won’t do you one lick of good unless you work the plan. Don’t allow the plan to stay in a document on your computer.

Keep your plan in front of you, turn it into a wall poster or tattoo it on your forearm. Do what you can to see that your plan stays top of mind.

Most importantly, take action. Every little step gets you closer to your dream.

Your Turn

Your actions speak louder than words.

Are you walking the talk?

What needs to change in order for you to be in alignment?

We are now taking applications for the Art Biz Inner Circle for 2017.

Read about how I can help you decide on the right actions for you.

Send to Kindle

7 comments to Aligning Actions with Words = Success

  • I always love your posts, Alyson. As a new author, I’m spending so much time marketing my brand new book, and not as much time in my studio. It’s sometimes hard to balance all of it: teaching/art making/marketing a new book. But I’m working on it. Thanks for caring.
    PS Love the artwork in this post!

  • All critical points for running a successful art business. It took me ages to learn that marketing consistently was the best way to move paintings out of my studio and into the hands of collectors. Each work day is part planning, marketing and art. I wish it was just art though 🙂

  • Thank you for laying this out concisely….and with heart❗💝❤💛💙💜💚

  • I love your posts and I am taking all of this info to heart. I definitely need to make some changes to get my art business off the ground, and you are helping. Thank you!

  • Margit

    Thanks Alyson for your inspiration and advice. The creation is always a pleasure, but marketing is a big effort and time consuming!

  • Josephine Palmer-Gabe

    I have to agree with Margit , and it is so very hard to control computer time as it never goes as planned . What could be an hour can easily be days to achieve.

  • Bug

    Seems to me that calling the occasional marketer a “dabbler” is a bit harsh. Dabbling in marketing, certainly. But an artist can be a great producer but not have the need for the income, and not be a dabbler in terms of making art. I have met people who think this way: the people who should have the art are the people for whom the art speaks strongly, for whom life is enriched by the art, not necessarily only those who can afford it or be convinced to buy it. However, understanding that your blog, Alyson, is about “biz”, your points are well taken.