How to Leverage an Article About Your Art

Congratulations! You had an article written about your art.

©Juliet R Harrison, Coming Into the Frame. Photograph. Used with permission.

©Juliet R. Harrison, Coming Into the Frame. Photograph. Used with permission.

Whether it is in a newspaper or magazine or published on a blog, website, or as a podcast, you are deservedly thrilled and want to share the good news.

How do you do this?

How widely you share the article and how you share it depends on the importance of the article (not all articles are created equal) and the format in which it was published.

Who will care about this as much as you?
Who will be happy for you?
Who would be bummed if they didn’t hear?

Most importantly … Who needs to know about this?

Here are some ideas for leveraging an article about your art.

Let Your List in on It

If the article is substantial and has keen insights, a solo email outside of any regularly scheduled emails is in order.

If it’s an honor, but not terribly meaty, add the article to a section in your regular email or newsletter.

Share It on Social Media

Sharing your good news on social media is a given, but why not get a little more creative than posting the link?

Take a photo of it within an interesting composition. Perhaps it’s a selfie or includes your pet or is hanging on a clothesline.

If it’s digital only, you can still snap a selfie pointing at the screen.

You’re an artist. Be creative!

©Kim Harrell, Venus. Sterling silver, gold, and diamonds, pendant 80 x 45 millimeters, neckwire 18 inches x 460 millimeters. Used with permission.

©Kim Harrell, Venus. Sterling silver, gold, and diamonds, pendant 80 x 45 millimeters, neckwire 18 inches x 460 millimeters. Used with permission.

Add It to Your Website

Keep track of such accomplishments by adding them to your website.

If you haven’t appeared in the media a lot, you can include the article on your About page.

If you’ve been racking up media appearances, it’s probably time to make a Media or News page, like Victoria Veedell has done. I love the way her page is so visually engaging – not just a pile of links.

Do you blog? You might also write a blog post about the interview process (if it’s interesting) or as a follow-up to what was in print.

Now to the most critical step …

Tell Your Collectors and Those You Are Wooing

©Jeffrey Hirst, Mies 880. Collagraph and solarplate, image size 7 x 5 inches. Used with permission.

©Jeffrey Hirst, Mies 880. Collagraph and solarplate, image size 7 x 5 inches. Used with permission.

If, again, the article is substantial, use it as a promotional piece.

Your collectors will be proud to know of your accomplishments, and potential venues and buyers might be equally impressed. Consider sharing it with consultants, designers, and gallerists.

If your article is online, send a personal email to these individual VIPs with an enticing reason for them to click – and, when appropriate, a note of gratitude for their support to this point.

If the article is in print, snag as many copies as you can. Otherwise, invest in color photocopies to share.

You might send the entire publication with a handwritten sticky note flagging the page where the article begins.

Your Turn

The possibilities are numerous – how have you leveraged an article about your art?

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