20 Ways to Lure People to Your Website

It’s the darndest thing about having a website: people aren’t going to visit just because you build it.

Creating a website is just the first step. Now you have to attract people to it, and driving traffic to your site is an ongoing task.

©Carolyn Caldwell, Mail Boat. Pastel, 22 x 18.5 inches. Used with permission.

©Carolyn Caldwell, Mail Boat. Pastel, 22 x 18.5 inches. Used with permission.

Add some of these ideas to your marketing mix for more eyes on your art.

Best, Basic Practices

1. Write a newsletter article with a hook, which requires recipients to visit your site to read the end of the article.

2. In your emails and social media posts, tell people why they should click. What’s in it for them? Why should they interrupt their focus and visit your site?

3. Give something away to people who visit your site and sign up for your list.

4. Mention your website address on your voicemail.

5. Add your website address to the back or underside of your art! If an attached piece of paper disappears, the website will still be with the piece. (If you work through galleries, run this by them first.)

©Brooke Harker, Downtown Stride. Ink, oil and acrylic, 90 x 60 inches. Used with permission.

©Brooke Harker, Downtown Stride. Ink, oil and acrylic, 90 x 60 inches. Used with permission.

6. Blog regularly. People are more likely to return if they know there is going to be fresh content.

Social Media Strategies

7. Ask a few bloggers you admire if you could write a guest post for them. Include the link to your website in your byline.

8. Make sure your website link is visible to the public on your personal and business profiles on Facebook, Instagram, Pinterest, and LinkedIn. I’m surprised at how many artists don’t do this. (See more about this under One Final Lesson at the bottom of this blog post.)

9. If you have a business page on Facebook, see that it is your employer on your personal profile. It’s easy to do. Click on “Edit Profile” and then “Add a workplace.” Start typing in the name of your business page and save.

10. Change your website URL frequently on Instagram. Feature links to different pages or artworks in the bio area that is hyperlink-able on the platform.

11. Become an active member of a Facebook or LinkedIn group for your niche market. The more you comment and post, the more people will be able to connect with you and be exposed to your site.

12. When you pin your art to Pinterest, pin it directly from your site so that your URL shows up with the pin. If you upload images to Pinterest, type your URL into the image description.

13. Leave thoughtful comments on blogs with an avatar that is an image of your art with a link back to your site if you can. Get your universal avatar for all WordPress blogs. (See Final Lesson at the end.)

Stop Sending People to Your Home Page

Can we agree that almost every other page on your site is more interesting than your home page? If so, then why do you keep encouraging people to land on your home page? Instead …

14. Switch out the URL in your signature block to point to a specific page or piece of art on your site. For example: My new body of work celebrates working women → http://…

15. Send tweets that entice followers to explore the interior pages of your site and blog posts.

©Jane Dickson, Celebrate Your Leap of Faith. Acrylic and pencil on watercolour paper, 22 x 30 inches. Used with permission.

©Jane Dickson, Celebrate Your Leap of Faith. Acrylic and pencil on watercolour paper, 22 x 30 inches. Used with permission.

16. Use QR Codes on exhibition labels that lead art viewers directly to a page on your site or blog with a description of the piece they’re looking at.

Crazier Things Have Been Done

Let’s face it, the best way to get people to your site is with some kind of online communication because it’s easier for people to click than to remember to type in a URL in their browser.
Still, you might consider ordering custom items with your website address printed on them, such as:

17. Bumper stickers

18. Tire covers

19. T-shirts

20. Baseball caps

One Final Lesson

The artists featured on this post (with the images linked to their sites) appear here because they left a comment on my blog or Facebook page, and I could find their websites quickly.

 

©Karen Phillips, Energized, Mind Travel series. Mixed media on paper, mounted on board, 10 x 10 inches. Used with permission.

©Karen Phillips, Energized, Mind Travel series. Mixed media on paper, mounted on board, 10 x 10 inches. Used with permission.

When I first started including artists’ work in my posts, it took me at least an hour to find images to feature when it should have taken about 15 minutes. I would spend time clicking on artists’ names from my Facebook page that led nowhere.

I wasn’t “friends” with them, so I couldn’t see their site (if they had it posted). Also, my policy of “no watermarks” limited my choices.

If those artists had commented as a business page while on the Art Biz Coach page on Facebook, it would have made it easier because I would have known that I could access their information.

Since then, I have come to only use art from artists who comment on my blog and leave a website link. I don’t think I’m alone in not having time to fish around for contact and website information. There’s always other art to look at.

Make it easy for people to find you and your work so that you don’t miss out on opportunities to share.

How do you get traffic to your site?

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