4 Reasons Your Website Isn’t Generating Sales

Your website is for generating sales and opportunities – even if you don’t sell directly from your site. You’re using your site as a digital portfolio to sell galleries and other venues on the idea of your art.

There are numerous factors as to why some art sells better online than others. Perhaps the work is more “popular” or more affordable. Or maybe the artists use their lists and social media more effectively.

Without taking those things into account, there are four errors you should correct immediately if you would like more sales and opportunities. Each is a step toward making it easier for people to buy.

1. You make people click multiple times to see the art.

If your website hasn’t been updated in years, you might have an old template that makes people click numerous links to see your art. It’s time for a major overhaul.

Can you imagine walking into a gallery and not knowing what they sell? If you’re sending people to your site to see, appreciate and, perhaps, purchase your art, you’d better show it to them on every page.

That’s right: every page. Your website has acres of virtual real estate that needs your art to make it attractive to visitors. Use it!

You never know where people will land on your site, so see that the art is the main feature.

2. You don’t make it clear what you’re selling.

Would you install your art in a space without a label next to it? No!

Would you want anyone else to install your art without acknowledging you as the maker? Absolutely not! You’d probably get miffed (and rightly so) if someone did.

And, yet, many artists are showing their art online without giving themselves proper credit. A credit line looks like this.

©Your Name, Title of Artwork. Medium (be specific), size (H x W x D inches/cm). Photo credit if necessary.

You can see the above format in use under the featured images on this post. Yours doesn’t have to follow this exact configuration. You can vary the sequence and punctuation as long as the credit line includes each of those elements and as long as you are consistent.

Potential buyers more easily imagine the art in their space and lives when they know specifics. You not only need to be clear about medium and size, but also about matting, framing, and anything else that would be included.

Take photos of the art in situ, or installed in an office or home environment to help people

Continue reading…

Mastering Subject Lines in 49 Characters or Less

Email messages are the steam engine behind much of your marketing these days. They’re cheap, they’re fast, and . . . they’re completely ineffective unless recipients open them and act on the message.

Recipients are tempted to open messages, in large part, based on what they encounter in the subject line.

Your subject line is almost more important than the content of the email. If the message is never opened, you might as well have not sent it.

To the point: The purpose of your email subject line is to get the recipient to open the email. It’s not a space-filler and should never be an afterthought. You can’t take a subject line for granted. Follow these 7 tips for better subject lines.

1. Make it personal.

Think about your subscribers and readers. Which ones are your strongest prospects? Which are your loyal collectors?

Write directly to these people as you’re crafting your message and your subject line by opting for the words You and Your over Me, My and Mine as much as possible. Write to them in a conversational, authentic tone.

The words You and Your are powerful. Did you notice how many times I’ve used them in this article? I’m writing to you, not for or about me. Examples of You-centered subject lines include the following.

  • It won’t be a party if you’re not there
  • Can’t wait to show you the 3rd photo from the left
  • Picture yourself sipping wine and looking at art

2. Be specific.

Don’t use the same subject line for every email to your list. If we see the subject line News from Diane Jenson’s Studio every month in our inboxes, we begin to think it’s the same message over and over again.

You want readers to know that there is unique content in each message. Using the same subject line for every email masks the value of the individual messages.

If you’re promoting a particular event in your email, use the location of the event in the subject line.

  • Just 1 of 82 artists in Breckenridge next weekend
  • Chocolate and art in New Orleans Nov 5

Or use the title of a specific work instead of simply acknowledging “new work” in general. These two examples use titles from real-life artwork.

  • Cake on Cake—the fat-free version
  • Dazed and Confused? There’s a painting for that

3. Use numerals instead of text.

The number 50 has more of a visual impact than the word fifty. Note, however,

Continue reading…

Bundling To Increase Your Income

A few weeks ago I had a sale of my audio products. I didn’t discount the products themselves. Instead, I bundled them together and added bonuses. If you’re open to creative solutions for selling your art, consider having a bundle sale instead of a discount sale of your products.

Continue reading…

Steal This Checklist for Your Next Product Launch

le going through the product-launch checklist for my new Pricing Your Art audio program, I thought it might be helpful to share the list with those of you who create products that you sell online: e-books, note cards, classes, and so forth.

Continue reading…

Stop Sending People to Your Home Page

When seeking a specific action, be sure to create a landing page to direct people to on your site, which focuses on the product, service or program you wish to promote.

Continue reading…

The Right Audience – Where are they?

Finding the “right audience” key to successful sales, but how do you go about doing that?

Continue reading…

Sure Signs of an Internet Scam and How to Stop It Cold

Many of you already know about Internet scams, but I need to emphasize the importance of being vigilant and asking a lot of questions when someone expresses interest in your art through email.

Continue reading…

One for You, One for Me: Pay for Your Art Materials Up Front

Gary Peters

Guest blogger Gary Peters shares his idea for getting his art materials paid for up front while rewarding his special supporters. Includes a special report for Art Biz Blog readers.

Continue reading…

Podcast: Appraise an online gallery

Every day there are new opportunities to show your art online, but how do you know which online galleries are legitimate? Appraise an online gallery by asking questions and assessing its components. Asking questions is not a sign of distrust, but a hallmark of a responsible professional.

Related

Newsletter (a written version of this podcast)

Listen & Download

The last episode of the Art Marketing Action podcast was November 22, 2010. You can listen to or download any episode on iTunes.

Send to Kindle

Handling Overseas Art Sales

How do you handle overseas orders? Michael Lynn Adams asks:

I have a buyer who lives in South Africa (actually London, moving to South Africa). I am in Los Angeles. They will arrange and pay for shipping once payment for the paintings has cleared on my end.The question: What is the best practice for long- distance payments? And, had the buyers not been willing to arrange for shipping, best practices or advice about that.I do not trust personal checks and am not comfortable with money orders or cashiers checks. I do not have a credit card services account. However, I do have a Paypal merchant account that I have yet to use. One Paypal option is to create a Paypal invoice, but I am not sure if that gives the buyer credit card payment as an

Continue reading…