7 Ways You Might Be Scaring Off Potential Buyers

Art buyers often have as many insecurities about the process of buying art as you do, which means they are sensitive to the signals you’re sending.

It’s your job to reassure them that they are making the right decisions – and you can do so in very subtle ways without resorting to sales speak.

And it has just as much to do with what you don’t do and say.

Here are seven practices that will scare off your audience and potential fans.

1. Being indecisive about prices.

Indecision makes you appear less confident.

Set your prices after you’ve done your homework and be ready to share them in person and online.

If you’re ever pushed for a price that you aren’t certain about, say, “Let me check my list and get back to you. I wouldn’t want to give you the wrong price.”

2. Apologizing for your art.

The apologetic artist who brushes aside compliments about her art is not market-attractive.

I am not in any way condoning arrogance. I’m saying that you need to hold your head up and say “Thank You” when you are given a compliment.

As Julia Child said in Julie & Julia, “Never apologize. No excuses. No explanations.” Along the same lines . . .

3. Playing down the fact that you’re an artist.

Heart surgeons don’t look at the ground and say, “I’m kind of a heart surgeon.” When someone asks what you do, you shouldn’t respond meekly with, “Well, I’m kind of an artist.”

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In a Cash Crunch? Try These Ideas to Bring in the Bucks

We are officially at the halfway point for 2017. Are you halfway to your financial goals for the year?

As all of my students and clients know, I stress the importance of “doing the numbers” before it’s too late.

Doing your numbers means figuring out where the money is coming in, identifying the leaks, and seeing clearly the best return on your investment of time and resources.

For conducting this process, you are rewarded with clarity like you’ve never had before. What you see might not be the beacon of hope you were looking for, but at least you are armed with knowledge to make sound financial decisions.

When your numbers aren’t where you’d like them to be (a realization we’re all faced with at some point or another), consider options to increase your income quickly.

Focus on how to maximize your return with limited time and resources to invest. This means concentrating on larger sales. It’s not the time to create a new stream of income for a new audience.

The first step is to get extra clear on how much you need to earn and figure out what the path to that number looks like. Specifically: What is your monetary goal and what will it take to reach that goal?

How many students or clients do you need to enroll to equal your goal?

How many artworks do you need to sell in a particular size to equal your goal? And do you have enough inventory?

My first choice when looking for fast cash is to …

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How To Discuss Slow Sales with Your Gallery

Sales are slow.

You’ve been with the gallery for a short time (let’s say just over a year) and you expected them to sell more art for you, but it’s just not happening.

Or maybe you’ve been with them longer. They sold a lot of your work at one point, but sales have dropped off significantly in the past couple of years.

So what now – do you ask for your work to be returned? Not yet.

Opening a dialogue is your first course of action. Regardless of the outcome, you will be admired for your professionalism.

Bringing Up Slow Sales with Your Gallery

The conversation you have with your gallerist about slow sales depends on a number of factors, including:

  • How long they have represented you.
  • The terms of your agreement with them.
  • The nature of your past relationship.
  • The demand for your work outside of their venue.

How do you begin a conversation considering these factors? Here are three options.

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Awe Your Collectors With This Follow-up Plan

Converse shoes

You might be leaving money on the table.

People who buy from you once – whether it’s a work of art or your teaching services – are more likely to buy from you again than people who have never bought from you.

It’s less effort to nurture relationships with people who already know, like, and trust you than to find new people to share your art with.

Take care of the people who have purchased from you. Show them you care now instead of contacting them only when you want something from them.

One of the biggest mistakes artist-entrepreneurs make is not following up with people who have given them money. Here’s a plan to awe your collectors – not just once, but over the course of your relationship.

If you sell art from your studio, rather than through a gallery, you have no excuses for not following up appropriately. You have the name and contact information of your collectors. Gallery artists envy you because that data isn’t usually shared with them.

Follow this plan to stay in touch with collectors.

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A Creative Idea for Unloading Earlier Art

gavel

There’s too much art hiding in studios, basements, and garages.

If you have a problem with overflowing inventory, especially a lot of earlier art that you aren’t excited about showing, how about finding new homes for that work? At the same time, you’ll create room for new art, support a good cause, and earn income.

Organize a Fundraiser

Yep, I’m talking about a fundraiser.

Now before you cut me off because you think I’m going to tell you to donate your art, hang tight. Just the opposite is true because you’re going to make money on this fundraiser.

There must be a cause that is close to your heart: animals, the environment, education, an art

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16 Non-Gallery Sales Avenues from 1 Artist

Carol McArdle, Florida Fantasy

Artist X has sold 45 original works of art over the past five or six years – on her own – without participating in art festivals. She breaks down the 16 different ways those 45 paintings found new homes.

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Eight Reasons to Use an E-junkie Shopping Cart

Lisa Call recently replaced PayPal “Buy It Now” buttons with an E-junkie shopping cart for selling artwork on her art website: lisacall.com. She tells you why she made the switch in this guest post.

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Sure Signs of an Internet Scam and How to Stop It Cold

Many of you already know about Internet scams, but I need to emphasize the importance of being vigilant and asking a lot of questions when someone expresses interest in your art through email.

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More Thoughts on Having a Sale on Your Art

Slapping a SALE sign on one’s art isn’t always a good idea. Certain types of art lend themselves better to sales and you should never put your newest work on sale. Read on for 5 short tips.

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Dealing with Bumps in the Road: Remember to Persevere

Barbara Petterson, Out to Lunch, Acrylic on hardboard

After you’ve analyzed why your art isn’t selling as well as you’d like, take a moment and review these 7 key points.

1. Remember that you are a work in progress.

You and your work will evolve over time, learning from triumphs and mistakes, figuring out what works and what doesn’t, and building on experiences. You must learn to deal with rejection and not take it personally.

2. Remember to seek strong support systems.

I have worked with and known all types of artists from every background imaginable. It is very rare that an artist succeeds without having support systems in place. Whether your system consists of friends, family members or other artists, consider it indispensable. Your supporters are there for

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